Bristol Myers Squibb Presents New Research at ASCO and EHA 2021 Featuring Novel Approaches and Demonstrating Significant Progress to Improve Survival in Cancer and Blood Disorders

First Phase 3 data from the RELATIVITY-047 trial highlight clinical benefit of LAG-3 blocking antibody relatlimab – the company’s third distinct checkpoint inhibitor – in combination with nivolumab for patients with previously untreated unresectable or metastatic melanoma

First disclosure of results from CheckMate -648 demonstrate Opdivo (nivolumab) plus Yervoy (ipilimumab) and Opdivo plus chemotherapy’s potential to address unmet needs in advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

Long-term data in non-small cell lung cancer and metastatic melanoma continue to show durable survival benefits with Opdivo plus Yervoy-based combinations

New long-term results from KarMMa study of Abecma (idecabtagene vicleucel) and combination data from an early phase study of novel CELMoD agent iberdomide underscore potential of new therapeutic approaches for patients with multiple myeloma

First disclosure of results from Phase 2 BEYOND study evaluating Reblozyl (luspatercept) plus best supportive care demonstrate first-in-class erythroid maturation agent’s potential in adults with non-transfusion-dependent beta (β)-thalassemia

PRINCETON, N.J.--()--Bristol Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY) today announced the presentation of research demonstrating the potential of its medicines to deliver long-term survival, improve outcomes and address areas of high unmet need across cancers and blood disorders at the 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Virtual Annual Meeting, June 4-8, and the European Hematology Association (EHA) 2021 Virtual Congress, June 9-17. Data from more than 75 company-sponsored studies, investigator-sponsored studies and collaborations evaluating compounds across 18 cancer types and blood disorders will be featured at the two meetings, including two abstracts (Abstract #9503 and #LBA4001) selected for the official ASCO press program and one (Abstract #S101) for the EHA presidential symposium.

“Our breadth of data at this year’s ASCO and EHA meetings highlights our diverse pipeline, with numerous approaches aimed at addressing the underlying biology of cancer and blood disorders,” said Samit Hirawat, M.D., executive vice president, chief medical officer, Global Drug Development, Bristol Myers Squibb. “Through our comprehensive research programs, we’re exploring how immunotherapy combinations may improve survival outcomes for patients with cancer, leading significant advances in cell therapy and erythroid maturation and building on decades of experience in protein degradation to evaluate more potent agents. As we make progress in developing new therapies, we recognize that the needs of patients extend beyond treatment, and we are committed to supporting all aspects of care for all patients. In collaboration with the community, we're working to improve survivorship support and to advance health equity in a time when disparities in care have become an even more pressing issue."

Key data being presented by Bristol Myers Squibb at ASCO and EHA 2021 include:

Solid Tumor

  • First presentation of results from the RELATIVITY-047 trial evaluating the LAG-3 blocking antibody relatlimab, the company’s third distinct checkpoint inhibitor and latest innovation, demonstrating clinical benefit for patients in a fixed-dose combination with nivolumab. These data are part of the official ASCO press program on May 14, 2021.
  • Longest-ever survival data of the Opdivo (nivolumab) plus Yervoy (ipilimumab) combination from CheckMate -067, demonstrating durable survival benefits over 6.5 years in patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma.
  • First disclosure of data from CheckMate -648 showcasing survival benefits of Opdivo plus chemotherapy and Opdivo plus Yervoy, as well as expanded efficacy and safety data from CheckMate -649, with both trials supporting Opdivo’s demonstrated superior first-line efficacy for patients with upper gastrointestinal cancers with high unmet needs. The CheckMate -648 data are part of the official ASCO press program on May 28, 2021.
  • Expanded efficacy and safety results from CheckMate -577, the first and only trial to demonstrate superior efficacy of Opdivo monotherapy in the adjuvant setting in patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
  • Two- and four-year data from the CheckMate -9LA and CheckMate -227 trials, reinforcing the role of Opdivo plus Yervoy-based combinations in improving long-term survival for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the first-line setting.
  • Surgical outcomes data from the CheckMate -816 trial that show the potential of neoadjuvant treatment with Opdivo plus chemotherapy to increase pathological response without negatively impacting surgery for patients with earlier-stage NSCLC.

Hematology

  • Longer-term efficacy and safety results presented in collaboration with bluebird bio from the pivotal KarMMa study of Abecma (idecabtagene vicleucel), the first BCMA-directed CAR T cell therapy, in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, reinforcing the company’s commitment to advancing cell therapies.
  • First data disclosure from Phase 2 BEYOND study of Reblozyl (luspatercept), a first-in-class erythroid maturation agent, plus best supportive care, demonstrating its clinical benefit and potential in patients with non-transfusion-dependent beta (β)-thalassemia. These data are part of the official EHA press briefing and presidential symposium on June 11, 2021.
  • New combination data from the Phase 1/2 MM-001 study of iberdomide, highlighting the potential of CELMoD® compounds in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma and underscoring the company’s foundation in protein degradation research.
  • Overall survival and progression-free survival analyses for Inrebic (fedratinib), the first treatment approved in Europe for myelofibrosis in nearly a decade, from the JAKARTA and JAKARTA-2 studies in patients with newly diagnosed and previously treated myelofibrosis.
  • New analyses from QUAZAR AML-001 confirming survival benefits of Onureg (azacitidine tablets; CC-486) across different disease subtypes and baseline characteristics in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in the maintenance treatment setting.

Summary of Presentations

Select Bristol Myers Squibb studies at the 2021 ASCO Virtual Annual Meeting include:

Abstract Title

Author

Presentation Type/#

Session Title

Session Date/Time

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Prognostic factors of overall (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in remission after intensive chemotherapy (IC): Multivariate analyses from the QUAZAR AML-001 trial of oral azacytidine (Oral-AZA)

Gail J. Roboz

Poster Discussion Abstract # 7014

Hematologic Malignancies—Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Allotransplant

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Gastrointestinal

Nivolumab (NIVO) plus ipilimumab (IPI) or NIVO plus chemotherapy (chemo) versus chemo as first-line (1L) treatment for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC): First results of the CheckMate 648 study

 

Ian Chau

Oral

Abstract # LBA4001

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Saturday, June 5, 2021: 1:45 PM - 4:45 PM EDT

 

ASCO Press Program Friday, May 28, 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM EDT

First-line (1L) nivolumab (NIVO) plus chemotherapy (chemo) versus chemo in advanced gastric cancer/gastroesophageal junction cancer/esophageal adenocarcinoma (GC/GEJC/EAC): Expanded efficacy and safety data from CheckMate 649

Markus H. Moehler

Oral

Abstract # 4002

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Saturday, June 5, 2021: 1:45 PM - 4:45 PM EDT

Adjuvant nivolumab (NIVO) in resected esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer (EC/GEJC) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT): Expanded efficacy and safety analyses from CheckMate 577

Ronan J. Kelly

Oral

Abstract # 4003

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Saturday, June 5, 2021: 1:45 PM - 4:45 PM EDT

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients (pts) with advanced gastric cancer/gastroesophageal junction cancer (GC/GEJC) or esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC): Interim results of nivolumab plus chemotherapy (N+C) versus (C) from CheckMate 649

Lucjan Wyrwicz

Poster

Abstract # 4066

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Genitourinary

Nivolumab plus cabozantinib (N+C) versus sunitinib (S) for advanced renal cell carcinoma (aRCC): Outcomes by baseline disease characteristics in the phase 3 CheckMate 9ER trial

Andrea B. Apolo

Poster

Abstract # 4553

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease progression or toxicity (Q-TWiST) of nivolumab plus cabozantinib (N+C) versus sunitinib (SUN) in treatment-naïve, advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma (aRCC): A post-hoc analysis of CheckMate 9ER (CM 9ER) data

David Cella

Poster

Abstract # 6567

Health Services Research and Quality Improvement

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Long-term trend of quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicities (Q-TWiST) of nivolumab+ipilimumab (N+I) versus sunitinib (SUN) for the first-line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (aRCC)

Robert J. Motzer

Poster

Abstract # 6568

Health Services Research and Quality Improvement

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Efficacy outcomes of nivolumab + cabozantinib versus pembrolizumab + axitinib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (aRCC): Matching-adjusted indirect comparison (MAIC)​

Bradley A. McGregor

Poster

Abstract # 4578

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Impact of recurrence on health-related quality of life in patients at high risk of recurrence after radical surgery for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (MIUC): Results from the phase 3 CheckMate 274 trial

Matthew D. Galsky

Poster

Abstract # 4540

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Safety and efficacy outcomes with nivolumab plus ipilimumab in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma and brain metastases: results from the CheckMate 920 trial

Hamid Emamekhoo

Poster Discussion Abstract # 4515

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Friday, June 4, 2021:

9:00 AM EDT

Melanoma

Relatlimab (RELA) plus nivolumab (NIVO) versus NIVO in first-line advanced melanoma: Primary phase III results from RELATIVITY-047 (CA224-047)

 

Evan J. Lipson

Oral

Abstract # 9503

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Sunday, June 6, 2021: 8:00 AM-11:00 AM EDT

 

ASCO Press Program Friday, May 14, 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM EDT

CheckMate 067: 6.5-year outcomes in patients (pts) with advanced melanoma

 

Jedd D. Wolchok

Oral

Abstract # 9506

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Sunday, June 6, 2021: 8:00 AM-11:00 AM EDT

Two dosing regimens of nivolumab (NIVO) plus ipilimumab (IPI) for advanced (adv) melanoma: Three-year results of CheckMate 511

Celeste Lebbé

Poster Discussion

Abstract # 9516

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Analysis of patients (pts) with in-transit metastases treated with nivolumab (NIVO) or ipilimumab (IPI) in CheckMate 238

James Larkin

Poster

Abstract # 9569

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Treatment outcomes in patients (pts) with melanoma brain metastases (MBM) treated with systemic therapy: A systematic literature review (SLR) and meta-analysis

Hussein A. Tawbi

Poster

Abstract # 9561

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Association of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and treatment safety with nivolumab (NIVO) in patients (pts) with resected stage IIIB/C or IV melanoma: Analysis of CheckMate 238 four-year follow-up (FU) data

Jeffery S. Weber

Poster

Abstract # 9574

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Multiple Myeloma

Characteristics of neurotoxicity associated with idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel, bb2121) in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) in the pivotal phase II KarMMa study

Salomon Manier

Poster

Abstract # 8036

Hematologic Malignancies—Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel, bb2121), a BCMA-directed CAR T cell therapy, in relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma: Updated KarMMa results

Larry D. Anderson, Jr

Poster Discussion Abstract # 8016

Hematologic Malignancies—Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

KarMMa-4: Idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel, bb2121), a BCMA-directed CAR T-cell therapy in high-risk newly diagnosed multiple myeloma

Saad Z. Usmani

Poster

Abstract # TPS8053

Hematologic Malignancies—Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Product Design & Delivery

CheckMate 8KX: Phase 1/2 multitumor preliminary analyses of a subcutaneous formulation of nivolumab (± rHuPH20)

Sara Lonardi

Poster

Abstract # 2575

Developmental

Therapeutics – Immunotherapy

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

Thoracic

Nivolumab (NIVO) plus ipilimumab (IPI) versus chemotherapy (chemo) as first-line (1L) treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): 4-year update from CheckMate 227

Luis G. Paz-Ares

Poster Discussion

Abstract # 9016

Lung Cancer—Non-Small Cell Metastatic

Friday, June 4, 2021: 9:00 AM EDT

First-line nivolumab (NIVO) plus ipilimumab (IPI) plus two cycles of chemotherapy (chemo) versus chemo alone (4 cycles) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Two-year update from CheckMate 9LA

Martin Reck

Oral

Abstract # 9000

Lung Cancer—Non-Small Cell Metastatic

Friday, June 4, 2021: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM EDT

Surgical outcomes from the phase 3 CheckMate 816 trial: Nivolumab (NIVO) + platinum-doublet chemotherapy (chemo) vs chemo alone as neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Jonathan Spicer

Oral

Abstract # 8503

Lung Cancer—Non-Small Cell Local-Regional/Small Cell/Other Thoracic Cancers

Sunday, June 6, 2021: 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM EDT

Select Bristol Myers Squibb studies at the 2021 EHA Virtual Congress include:

Abstract Title

Author

Presentation Type/#

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Survival Outcomes From the QUAZAR AML-001 Trial With Oral Azacitidine for Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission by Disease Subtype, Cytogenetic Risk, and NPM1 Mutation Status at Diagnosis

Hartmut Döhner

Oral Abstract # S131

Estimated Hospitalization-Related Costs With Oral-AZA vs PBO for Remission Maintenance in Patients With AML in Spain and the UK

Christopher Pocock

Oral Abstract # S311

Patient Preferences for Maintenance Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Discrete Choice Experiment Subanalysis of Patients in Germany and Italy

Katelyn Cutts

Publication # PB1398

A Phase 3 Study of Enasidenib Versus Conventional Care Regimens in Older Patients With Late-Stage Mutant-IDH2 R/R AML

Courtney DiNardo

Poster Abstract # EP457

Updated Pharmacodynamic and Survival Outcomes From the AG221-AML-005 Trial of Enasidenib Plus AZA in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Mutant IDH2 AML

Courtney DiNardo

Poster Abstract # EP465

Beta Thalassemia

The BEYOND Study: Results of a Phase 2, Double-blind, Randomized, Placebo (Pbo)-Controlled Multicenter Study of Luspatercept in Adult Patients (Pts) With Non-transfusion Dependent (Ntd) β-Thalassemia

Ali Taher

Oral Presidential Symposium # S101

Benefit of Continuing Therapy With Luspatercept in Patients With Beta-Thalassemia Who Do Not Achieve ≥33% Reduction in Red Blood Cell (RBC) Transfusion Burden (TB) in Weeks 13-24 in the BELIEVE Trial

Antonio Piga

Poster Abstract # EP1306

Fewer Red Blood Cell Transfusion Units and Visits Across Baseline Transfusion Burden Levels in Patients With Beta-Thalassemia Treated With Luspatercept in the Phase 3 BELIEVE Trial

Ali Taher

Poster Abstract # EP1304

Lymphoma

Safety & Efficacy Preliminary Results From a Phase 2 Study of Lisocabtagene Maraleucel (liso-cel) in the Non-university Setting

JT Godwin

Poster Abstract # EP541

Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma Receiving Third-Line Therapy: A Multicenter, Retrospective, Real-world Study in the United Kingdom

Christopher Fox

Poster Abstract # EP539

Multiple Myeloma

Characteristics of Neurotoxicity Associated With Idecabtagene Vicleucel (Ide-cel, bb2121) in Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma in the Pivotal Phase 2 KarMMa Study Salomon Manier Poster Abstract # EP984
Idecabtagene Vicleucel (Ide-cel, bb2121), a BCMA-Directed CAR T Cell Therapy, in Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma: Updated KarMMa Results

Albert Oriol

Poster Abstract # EP1009

Iberdomide (Iber) in Combination With Dexamethasone (Dex) and Daratumumab (Dara), Bortezomib (Bort), or Carfilzomib (Cfz) in Patients (Pts) With Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM)

Sagar Lonial

Oral Abstract # S187

Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of Iberdomide (Iber) in Combination With Dexamethasone and Daratumumab in a Phase 1/2 Trial for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Michael Amatangelo

Publication # PB1632

Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Benefit of Continuing Luspatercept Therapy in Patients With Lower-risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Who Did Not Achieve Red Blood Cell Transfusion Independence by Week 25 in the MEDALIST Study

Ulrich Germing

Poster Abstract # EP915

Luspatercept Reduces Red Blood Cell Transfusions in Patients With Lower-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Regardless of Baseline Transfusion Burden in the MEDALIST Study

Guillermo Garcia-Manero

Poster Abstract # EP920

Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Patients (Pts) With Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) in the CONNECT® Myeloid Disease Registry

Dennis Revicki

Poster Abstract # EP1182

Myelofibrosis

Overall and Progression-free Survival in Patients Treated With Fedratinib as First-line MF Therapy and After Prior RUX: Results From the JAKARTA and JAKARTA2 Trials

Claire Harrison

Oral Abstract # S203

The abstracts above are available on the EHA conference website. All presentations will be available on demand when published on the virtual congress platform on Friday, June 11, at 9:00 AM CEST (3 AM EDT).

Bristol Myers Squibb: Creating a Better Future for People with Cancer

Bristol Myers Squibb is inspired by a single vision — transforming patients’ lives through science. The goal of the company’s cancer research is to deliver medicines that offer each patient a better, healthier life and to make cure a possibility. Building on a legacy across a broad range of cancers that have changed survival expectations for many, Bristol Myers Squibb researchers are exploring new frontiers in personalized medicine, and through innovative digital platforms, are turning data into insights that sharpen their focus. Deep scientific expertise, cutting-edge capabilities and discovery platforms enable the company to look at cancer from every angle. Cancer can have a relentless grasp on many parts of a patient’s life, and Bristol Myers Squibb is committed to taking actions to address all aspects of care, from diagnosis to survivorship. Because as a leader in cancer care, Bristol Myers Squibb is working to empower all people with cancer to have a better future.

OPDIVO Indications

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express PD-L1 (≥1%) as determined by an FDA-approved test, with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab) and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving OPDIVO.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with intermediate or poor risk advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with cabozantinib, is indicated for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who have received prior anti-angiogenic therapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) that has relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and brentuximab vedotin or after 3 or more lines of systemic therapy that includes autologous HSCT. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with disease progression on or after platinum-based therapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma who have disease progression during or following platinum-containing chemotherapy or have disease progression within 12 months of neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment with platinum-containing chemotherapy. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric (12 years and older) patients with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) that has progressed following treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) that has progressed following treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have been previously treated with sorafenib. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in the confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have been previously treated with sorafenib. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in the confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of patients with melanoma with involvement of lymph nodes or metastatic disease who have undergone complete resection.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced, recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) after prior fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-based chemotherapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-containing chemotherapy, is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, gastroesophageal junction cancer, and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Immune-mediated adverse reactions listed herein may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.

Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. While immune-mediated adverse reactions usually manifest during treatment, they can also occur after discontinuation of OPDIVO or YERVOY. Early identification and management are essential to ensure safe use of OPDIVO and YERVOY. Monitor for signs and symptoms that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment with OPDIVO and before each dose of YERVOY. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). In general, if OPDIVO or YERVOY interruption or discontinuation is required, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy. Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed below.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. The incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.1% (61/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (2.1%). In HCC patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 10% (5/49) of patients. In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.9% (26/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.4%) and Grade 2 (2.6%). In NSCLC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 6 weeks, immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 9% (50/576) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.5%), Grade 3 (3.5%), and Grade 2 (4.0%). Four patients (0.7%) died due to pneumonitis.

In Checkmate 205 and 039, pneumonitis, including interstitial lung disease, occurred in 6.0% (16/266) of patients receiving OPDIVO. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 4.9% (13/266) of patients receiving OPDIVO, including Grade 3 (n=1) and Grade 2 (n=12).

Immune-Mediated Colitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may be fatal. A common symptom included in the definition of colitis was diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 2.9% (58/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.7%) and Grade 2 (1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 25% (115/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.4%), Grade 3 (14%) and Grade 2 (8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 9% (60/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.4%) and Grade 2 (3.7%).

In a separate Phase 3 trial of YERVOY 3 mg/kg monotherapy, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 12% (62/511) of patients, including Grade 3-5 (7%) and Grade 2 (5%).

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis and Hepatotoxicity

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 1.8% (35/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (1.3%), and Grade 2 (0.4%). In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy in Checkmate 040, immune-mediated hepatitis requiring systemic corticosteroids occurred in 5% (8/154) of patients. In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/ kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 15% (70/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (2.4%), Grade 3 (11%), and Grade 2 (1.8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 7% (48/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (1.2%), Grade 3 (4.9%), and Grade 2 (0.4%).

In a separate Phase 3 trial of YERVOY 3 mg/kg monotherapy, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 4.1% (21/511) of patients, including Grade 3-5 (1.6%) and Grade 2 (2.5%).

OPDIVO in combination with cabozantinib can cause hepatic toxicity with higher frequencies of Grade 3 and 4 ALT and AST elevations compared to OPDIVO alone. Consider more frequent monitoring of liver enzymes as compared to when the drugs are administered as single agents. In patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib, Grades 3 and 4 increased ALT or AST were seen in 11% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, immune-mediated hypophysitis, immune-mediated thyroid disorders, and Type 1 diabetes mellitus, which can present with diabetic ketoacidosis. Withhold OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism; initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism; initiate hormone replacement or medical management as clinically indicated. Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes; initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated.

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 1% (20/1994), including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 8% (35/456), including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.4%), and Grade 2 (4.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 7% (48/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (2.5%), and Grade 2 (4.1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 4.7% (15/320) of patients, including Grade 3 (2.2%) and Grade 2 (1.9%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypophysitis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (0.3%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypophysitis occurred in 9% (42/456), including Grade 3 (2.4%) and Grade 2 (6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypophysitis occurred in 4.4% (29/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (2.4%), and Grade 2 (0.9%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, thyroiditis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 2 (0.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, thyroiditis occurred in 2.7% (22/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.5%) and Grade 2 (2.2%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hyperthyroidism occurred in 2.7% (54/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) and Grade 2 (1.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hyperthyroidism occurred in 9% (42/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.9%) and Grade 2 (4.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hyperthyroidism occurred in 12% (80/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (4.5%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypothyroidism occurred in 8% (163/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (4.8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypothyroidism occurred in 20% (91/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (11%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypothyroidism occurred in 18% (122/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (11%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, diabetes occurred in 0.9% (17/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.3%), and 2 cases of diabetic ketoacidosis. In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, diabetes occurred in 2.7% (15/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.9%).

In a separate Phase 3 trial of YERVOY 3 mg/kg monotherapy, Grade 2-5 immune-mediated endocrinopathies occurred in 4% (21/511) of patients. Severe to life-threatening (Grade 3-4) endocrinopathies occurred in 9 (1.8%) patients. All 9 patients had hypopituitarism, and some had additional concomitant endocrinopathies such as adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism. Six of the 9 patients were hospitalized for severe endocrinopathies. Moderate (Grade 2) endocrinopathy occurred in 12 patients (2.3%), including hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, hypopituitarism, hyperthyroidism and Cushing’s syndrome.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated nephritis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction occurred in 1.2% (23/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.5%), and Grade 2 (0.6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated nephritis with renal dysfunction occurred in 4.1% (27/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (1.1%), and Grade 2 (2.2%).

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

OPDIVO can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) has occurred with PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate nonexfoliative rashes.

YERVOY can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis, including bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, SJS, TEN, and DRESS. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-bullous/ exfoliative rashes.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated rash occurred in 9% (171/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (2.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated rash occurred in 28% (127/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.8%) and Grade 2 (10%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated rash occurred in 16% (108/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (3.5%) and Grade 2 (4.2%).

In a separate Phase 3 trial of YERVOY 3 mg/kg monotherapy, immune-mediated rash occurred in 15% (76/511) of patients, including Grade 3-5 (2.5%) and Grade 2 (12%).

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received OPDIVO monotherapy or OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions: cardiac/vascular: myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis; nervous system: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; musculoskeletal and connective tissue: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis, and associated sequelae including renal failure, arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica; endocrine: hypoparathyroidism; other (hematologic/immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection.

In addition to the immune-mediated adverse reactions listed above, across clinical trials of YERVOY monotherapy or in combination with OPDIVO, the following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions, some with fatal outcome, occurred in <1% of patients unless otherwise specified: nervous system: autoimmune neuropathy (2%), myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis, motor dysfunction; cardiovascular: angiopathy, temporal arteritis; ocular: blepharitis, episcleritis, orbital myositis, scleritis; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis (1.3%); other (hematologic/immune): conjunctivitis, cytopenias (2.5%), eosinophilia (2.1%), erythema multiforme, hypersensitivity vasculitis, neurosensory hypoacusis, psoriasis.

Some ocular IMAR cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada–like syndrome, which has been observed in patients receiving OPDIVO and YERVOY, as this may require treatment with systemic corticosteroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Infusion-Related Reactions

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause severe infusion-related reactions. Discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY in patients with severe (Grade 3) or life-threatening (Grade 4) infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion in patients with mild (Grade 1) or moderate (Grade 2) infusion-related reactions. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 6.4% (127/1994) of patients. In a separate trial in which patients received OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion or a 30-minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.2% (8/368) and 2.7% (10/369) of patients, respectively. Additionally, 0.5% (2/368) and 1.4% (5/369) of patients, respectively, experienced adverse reactions within 48 hours of infusion that led to dose delay, permanent discontinuation or withholding of OPDIVO. In melanoma patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.5% (10/407) of patients. In HCC patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 8% (4/49) of patients. In RCC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg, infusion-related reactions occurred in 5.1% (28/547) of patients. In MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 4.2% (5/119) of patients. In MPM patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 6 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 12% (37/300) of patients.

In separate Phase 3 trials of YERVOY 3 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg monotherapy, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.9% (28/982) of patients.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with OPDIVO or YERVOY. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between OPDIVO or YERVOY and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. The effects of YERVOY are likely to be greater during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

Increased Mortality in Patients with Multiple Myeloma when OPDIVO is Added to a Thalidomide Analogue and Dexamethasone

In randomized clinical trials in patients with multiple myeloma, the addition of OPDIVO to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with multiple myeloma with a PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibody in combination with a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of OPDIVO or YERVOY in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 5 months after the last dose.

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 037, serious adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=268). Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions occurred in 42% of patients receiving OPDIVO. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse drug reactions reported in 2% to <5% of patients receiving OPDIVO were abdominal pain, hyponatremia, increased aspartate aminotransferase, and increased lipase. In Checkmate 066, serious adverse reactions occurred in 36% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=206). Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients receiving OPDIVO. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were gamma-glutamyltransferase increase (3.9%) and diarrhea (3.4%). In Checkmate 067, serious adverse reactions (74% and 44%), adverse reactions leading to permanent discontinuation (47% and 18%) or to dosing delays (58% and 36%), and Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions (72% and 51%) all occurred more frequently in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm (n=313) relative to the OPDIVO arm (n=313). The most frequent (≥10%) serious adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm and the OPDIVO arm, respectively, were diarrhea (13% and 2.2%), colitis (10% and 1.9%), and pyrexia (10% and 1.0%). In Checkmate 227, serious adverse reactions occurred in 58% of patients (n=576). The most frequent (≥2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea/colitis, pneumonitis, hepatitis, pulmonary embolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hypophysitis. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 1.7% of patients; these included events of pneumonitis (4 patients), myocarditis, acute kidney injury, shock, hyperglycemia, multi-system organ failure, and renal failure. In Checkmate 9LA, serious adverse reactions occurred in 57% of patients (n=358). The most frequent (>2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea, febrile neutropenia, anemia, acute kidney injury, musculoskeletal pain, dyspnea, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 7 (2%) patients, and included hepatic toxicity, acute renal failure, sepsis, pneumonitis, diarrhea with hypokalemia, and massive hemoptysis in the setting of thrombocytopenia. In Checkmate 017 and 057, serious adverse reactions occurred in 46% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=418). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, dyspnea, pyrexia, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. In Checkmate 057, fatal adverse reactions occurred; these included events of infection (7 patients, including one case of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia), pulmonary embolism (4 patients), and limbic encephalitis (1 patient). In Checkmate 743, serious adverse reactions occurred in 54% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were pneumonia, pyrexia, diarrhea, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, dyspnea, acute kidney injury, infusion-related reaction, musculoskeletal pain, and pulmonary embolism. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 4 (1.3%) patients and included pneumonitis, acute heart failure, sepsis, and encephalitis. In Checkmate 214, serious adverse reactions occurred in 59% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY (n=547). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were diarrhea, pyrexia, pneumonia, pneumonitis, hypophysitis, acute kidney injury, dyspnea, adrenal insufficiency, and colitis. In Checkmate 9ER, serious adverse reactions occurred in 48% of patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib (n=320). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were diarrhea, pneumonia, pneumonitis, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, and hyponatremia. Fatal intestinal perforations occurred in 3 (0.9%) patients. In Checkmate 025, serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=406). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were acute kidney injury, pleural effusion, pneumonia, diarrhea, and hypercalcemia. In Checkmate 205 and 039, adverse reactions leading to discontinuation occurred in 7% and dose delays due to adverse reactions occurred in 34% of patients (n=266). Serious adverse reactions occurred in 26% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥1% of patients were pneumonia, infusion-related reaction, pyrexia, colitis or diarrhea, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, and rash. Eleven patients died from causes other than disease progression: 3 from adverse reactions within 30 days of the last OPDIVO dose, 2 from infection 8 to 9 months after completing OPDIVO, and 6 from complications of allogeneic HSCT. In Checkmate 141, serious adverse reactions occurred in 49% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=236). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were pneumonia, dyspnea, respiratory failure, respiratory tract infection, and sepsis. In Checkmate 275, serious adverse reactions occurred in 54% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=270). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were urinary tract infection, sepsis, diarrhea, small intestine obstruction, and general physical health deterioration. In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=119), serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were colitis/diarrhea, hepatic events, abdominal pain, acute kidney injury, pyrexia, and dehydration. In Checkmate 040, serious adverse reactions occurred in 49% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=154). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were pyrexia, ascites, back pain, general physical health deterioration, abdominal pain, pneumonia, and anemia. In Checkmate 040, serious adverse reactions occurred in 59% of patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=49). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥4% of patients were pyrexia, diarrhea, anemia, increased AST, adrenal insufficiency, ascites, esophageal varices hemorrhage, hyponatremia, increased blood bilirubin, and pneumonitis. In Checkmate 238, serious adverse reactions occurred in 18% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=452). Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions occurred in 25% of OPDIVO-treated patients (n=452). The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of OPDIVO-treated patients were diarrhea and increased lipase and amylase. In Attraction-3, serious adverse reactions occurred in 38% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=209). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO were pneumonia, esophageal fistula, interstitial lung disease, and pyrexia. The following fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO: interstitial lung disease or pneumonitis (1.4%), pneumonia (1.0%), septic shock (0.5%), esophageal fistula (0.5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (0.5%), pulmonary embolism (0.5%), and sudden death (0.5%). In Checkmate 649, serious adverse reactions occurred in 52% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=782). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥ 2% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy were vomiting (3.7%), pneumonia (3.6%), anemia (3.6%), pyrexia (2.8%), diarrhea (2.7%), febrile neutropenia (2.6%), and pneumonitis (2.4%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 16 (2.0%) patients who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included pneumonitis (4 patients), febrile neutropenia (2 patients), stroke (2 patients), gastrointestinal toxicity, intestinal mucositis, septic shock, pneumonia, infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, mesenteric vessel thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

Common Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 037, the most common adverse reaction (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=268) was rash (21%). In Checkmate 066, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=206) vs dacarbazine (n=205) were fatigue (49% vs 39%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 25%), rash (28% vs 12%), and pruritus (23% vs 12%). In Checkmate 067, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm (n=313) were fatigue (62%), diarrhea (54%), rash (53%), nausea (44%), pyrexia (40%), pruritus (39%), musculoskeletal pain (32%), vomiting (31%), decreased appetite (29%), cough (27%), headache (26%), dyspnea (24%), upper respiratory tract infection (23%), arthralgia (21%), and increased transaminases (25%). In Checkmate 067, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO arm (n=313) were fatigue (59%), rash (40%), musculoskeletal pain (42%), diarrhea (36%), nausea (30%), cough (28%), pruritus (27%), upper respiratory tract infection (22%), decreased appetite (22%), headache (22%), constipation (21%), arthralgia (21%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 227, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (44%), rash (34%), decreased appetite (31%), musculoskeletal pain (27%), diarrhea/colitis (26%), dyspnea (26%), cough (23%), hepatitis (21%), nausea (21%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 9LA, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (49%), musculoskeletal pain (39%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (31%), rash (30%), decreased appetite (28%), constipation (21%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 017 and 057, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=418) were fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, cough, dyspnea, and decreased appetite. In Checkmate 743, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY were fatigue (43%), musculoskeletal pain (38%), rash (34%), diarrhea (32%), dyspnea (27%), nausea (24%), decreased appetite (24%), cough (23%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 214, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients treated with OPDIVO plus YERVOY (n=547) were fatigue (58%), rash (39%), diarrhea (38%), musculoskeletal pain (37%), pruritus (33%), nausea (30%), cough (28%), pyrexia (25%), arthralgia (23%), decreased appetite (21%), dyspnea (20%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 9ER, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib (n=320) were diarrhea (64%), fatigue (51%), hepatotoxicity (44%), palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (40%), stomatitis (37%), rash (36%), hypertension (36%), hypothyroidism (34%), musculoskeletal pain (33%), decreased appetite (28%), nausea (27%), dysgeusia (24%), abdominal pain (22%), cough (20%) and upper respiratory tract infection (20%). In Checkmate 025, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=406) vs everolimus (n=397) were fatigue (56% vs 57%), cough (34% vs 38%), nausea (28% vs 29%), rash (28% vs 36%), dyspnea (27% vs 31%), diarrhea (25% vs 32%), constipation (23% vs 18%), decreased appetite (23% vs 30%), back pain (21% vs 16%), and arthralgia (20% vs 14%). In Checkmate 205 and 039, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=266) were upper respiratory tract infection (44%), fatigue (39%), cough (36%), diarrhea (33%), pyrexia (29%), musculoskeletal pain (26%), rash (24%), nausea (20%) and pruritus (20%). In Checkmate 141, the most common adverse reactions (≥10%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=236) were cough (14%) and dyspnea (14%) at a higher incidence than investigator’s choice. In Checkmate 275, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=270) were fatigue (46%), musculoskeletal pain (30%), nausea (22%), and decreased appetite (22%). In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO as a single agent (n=74), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were fatigue (54%), diarrhea (43%), abdominal pain (34%), nausea (34%), vomiting (28%), musculoskeletal pain (28%), cough (26%), pyrexia (24%), rash (23%), constipation (20%), and upper respiratory tract infection (20%). In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=119), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were fatigue (49%), diarrhea (45%), pyrexia (36%), musculoskeletal pain (36%), abdominal pain (30%), pruritus (28%), nausea (26%), rash (25%), decreased appetite (20%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 040, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=154) were fatigue (38%), musculoskeletal pain (36%), abdominal pain (34%), pruritus (27%), diarrhea (27%), rash (26%), cough (23%), and decreased appetite (22%). In Checkmate 040, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=49), were rash (53%), pruritus (53%), musculoskeletal pain (41%), diarrhea (39%), cough (37%), decreased appetite (35%), fatigue (27%), pyrexia (27%), abdominal pain (22%), headache (22%), nausea (20%), dizziness (20%), hypothyroidism (20%), and weight decreased (20%). In Checkmate 238, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in OPDIVO-treated patients (n=452) vs ipilimumab-treated patients (n=453) were fatigue (57% vs 55%), diarrhea (37% vs 55%), rash (35% vs 47%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 27%), pruritus (28% vs 37%), headache (23% vs 31%), nausea (23% vs 28%), upper respiratory infection (22% vs 15%), and abdominal pain (21% vs 23%). The most common immune-mediated adverse reactions were rash (16%), diarrhea/colitis (6%), and hepatitis (3%). In Attraction-3, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in OPDIVO-treated patients (n=209) were rash (22%) and decreased appetite (21%). In Checkmate 649, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=782) were peripheral neuropathy (53%), nausea (48%), fatigue (44%), diarrhea (39%), vomiting (31%), decreased appetite (29%), abdominal pain (27%), constipation (25%), and musculoskeletal pain (20%).

In a separate Phase 3 trial of YERVOY 3 mg/kg, the most common adverse reactions (≥5%) in patients who received YERVOY at 3 mg/kg were fatigue (41%), diarrhea (32%), pruritus (31%), rash (29%), and colitis (8%).

Please see US Full Prescribing Information for OPDIVO and YERVOY.

Clinical Trials and Patient Populations

Checkmate 037–previously treated metastatic melanoma; Checkmate 066–previously untreated metastatic melanoma; Checkmate 067–previously untreated metastatic melanoma, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 227–previously untreated metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 9LA–previously untreated recurrent or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer in combination with YERVOY and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy by histology; Checkmate 017–second-line treatment of metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer; Checkmate 057–second-line treatment of metastatic non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer; Checkmate 743–previously untreated unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 214–previously untreated renal cell carcinoma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 9ER–previously untreated renal cell carcinoma, in combination with cabozantinib; Checkmate 025–previously treated renal cell carcinoma; Checkmate 205/039–classical Hodgkin lymphoma; Checkmate 141–recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; Checkmate 275–urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 142–MSI-H or dMMR metastatic colorectal cancer, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 040–hepatocellular carcinoma, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 238–adjuvant treatment of melanoma; Attraction-3–esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 649–previously untreated advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction or esophageal adenocarcinoma.

ABECMA Indication

ABECMA (idecabtagene vicleucel) is a B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapy indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma after four or more prior lines of therapy, including an immunomodulatory agent, a proteasome inhibitor, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

BOXED WARNING: CYTOKINE RELEASE SYNDROME, NEUROLOGIC TOXICITIES, HLH/MAS, AND PROLONGED CYTOPENIA

  • Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS), including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients following treatment with ABECMA. Do not administer ABECMA to patients with active infection or inflammatory disorders. Treat severe or life-threatening CRS with tocilizumab or tocilizumab and corticosteroids.
  • Neurologic Toxicities, which may be severe or life-threatening, occurred following treatment with ABECMA, including concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS. Monitor for neurologic events after treatment with ABECMA. Provide supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed.
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis/Macrophage Activation Syndrome (HLH/MAS) including fatal and life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients following treatment with ABECMA. HLH/MAS can occur with CRS or neurologic toxicities.
  • Prolonged Cytopenia with bleeding and infection, including fatal outcomes following stem cell transplantation for hematopoietic recovery, occurred following treatment with ABECMA.
  • ABECMA is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the ABECMA REMS.

Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS): CRS, including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred following treatment with ABECMA. CRS occurred in 85% (108/127) of patients receiving ABECMA. Grade 3 or higher CRS (Lee grading system) occurred in 9% (12/127) of patients, with Grade 5 CRS reported in one (0.8%) patient. The median time to onset of CRS, any grade, was 1 day (range: 1 - 23 days) and the median duration of CRS was 7 days (range: 1 - 63 days) in all patients including the patient who died. The most common manifestations of CRS included pyrexia (98%), hypotension (41%), tachycardia (35%), chills (31%), hypoxia (20%), fatigue (12%), and headache (10%). Grade 3 or higher events that may be associated with CRS include hypotension, hypoxia, hyperbilirubinemia, hypofibrinogenemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), atrial fibrillation, hepatocellular injury, metabolic acidosis, pulmonary edema, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and HLH/MAS.

Identify CRS based on clinical presentation. Evaluate for and treat other causes of fever, hypoxia, and hypotension. CRS has been reported to be associated with findings of HLH/MAS, and the physiology of the syndromes may overlap. HLH/MAS is a potentially life-threatening condition. In patients with progressive symptoms of CRS or refractory CRS despite treatment, evaluate for evidence of HLH/MAS.

Fifty four percent (68/127) of patients received tocilizumab; 35% (45/127) received a single dose while 18% (23/127) received more than 1 dose of tocilizumab. Overall, across the dose levels, 15% (19/127) of patients received at least 1 dose of corticosteroids for treatment of CRS. All patients that received corticosteroids for CRS received tocilizumab.

Overall rate of CRS was 79% and rate of Grade 2 CRS was 23% in patients treated in the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort. For patients treated in the 450 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort, the overall rate of CRS was 96% and rate of Grade 2 CRS was 40%. Rate of Grade 3 or higher CRS was similar across the dose range. The median duration of CRS for the 450 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort was 7 days (range: 1-63 days) and for the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort was 6 days (range: 2-28 days). In the 450 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort, 68% (36/53) of patients received tocilizumab and 23% (12/53) received at least 1 dose of corticosteroids for treatment of CRS. In the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort, 44% (31/70) of patients received tocilizumab and 10% (7/70) received corticosteroids. All patients that received corticosteroids for CRS also received tocilizumab. Ensure that a minimum of 2 doses of tocilizumab are available prior to infusion of ABECMA.

Monitor patients at least daily for 7 days following ABECMA infusion at the REMS-certified healthcare facility for signs and symptoms of CRS. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of CRS for at least 4 weeks after infusion. At the first sign of CRS, institute treatment with supportive care, tocilizumab and/or corticosteroids as indicated.

Counsel patients to seek immediate medical attention should signs or symptoms of CRS occur at any time.

Neurologic Toxicities: Neurologic toxicities, which may be severe or life-threatening, occurred following treatment with ABECMA, including concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS. CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity occurred in 28% (36/127) of patients receiving ABECMA, including Grade 3 in 4% (5/127) of patients. One patient had ongoing Grade 2 neurotoxicity at the time of death. Two patients had ongoing Grade 1 tremor at the time of data cutoff. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 2 days (range: 1 - 42 days). CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity resolved in 92% (33/36) of patients with a median duration of neurotoxicity was 5 days (range: 1 - 61 days). The median duration of neurotoxicity was 6 days (range: 1 - 578) in all patients including those with ongoing neurotoxicity at the time of death or data cut off. Thirty-four patients with neurotoxicity had CRS. Neurotoxicity had onset in 3 patients before, 29 patients during, and 2 patients after CRS. The rate of Grade 3 neurotoxicity was 8% in the 450 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort and 1.4% in the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort. The most frequently reported (greater than or equal to 5%) manifestations of CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity include encephalopathy (20%), tremor (9%), aphasia (7%), and delirium (6%). Grade 4 neurotoxicity and cerebral edema in 1 patient has been reported with ABECMA in another study in multiple myeloma. Grade 3 myelitis and Grade 3 parkinsonism have been reported after treatment with ABECMA in another study in multiple myeloma.

Monitor patients at least daily for 7 days following ABECMA infusion at the REMS-certified healthcare facility for signs and symptoms of neurologic toxicities. Rule out other causes of neurologic symptoms. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of neurologic toxicities for at least 4 weeks after infusion and treat promptly. Neurologic toxicity should be managed with supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed.

Counsel patients to seek immediate medical attention should signs or symptoms of neurologic toxicity occur at any time.

Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH)/Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS): HLH/MAS occurred in 4% (5/127) of patients receiving ABECMA. One patient treated in the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort developed fatal multi-organ HLH/MAS with CRS. In another patient with fatal bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, HLH/MAS was contributory to the fatal outcome. Three cases of Grade 2 HLH/MAS resolved. The rate of HLH/MAS was 8% in the 450 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort and 1% in the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort. All events of HLH/MAS had onset within 10 days of receiving ABECMA with a median onset of 7 days (range: 4-9 days) and occurred in the setting of ongoing or worsening CRS. Two patients with HLH/MAS had overlapping neurotoxicity. The manifestations of HLH/MAS include hypotension, hypoxia, multiple organ dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and cytopenia. HLH/MAS is a potentially life-threatening condition with a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated. Treatment of HLH/MAS should be administered per institutional standards.

ABECMA REMS: Due to the risk of CRS and neurologic toxicities, ABECMA is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the ABECMA REMS. Further information is available at www.AbecmaREMS.com or 18884235436.

Hypersensitivity Reactions: Allergic reactions may occur with the infusion of ABECMA. Serious hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, may be due to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in ABECMA.

Infections: ABECMA should not be administered to patients with active infections or inflammatory disorders. Severe, life-threatening, or fatal infections occurred in patients after ABECMA infusion. Infections (all grades) occurred in 70% of patients. Grade 3 or 4 infections occurred in 23% of patients. Overall, 4 patients had Grade 5 infections (3%); 2 patients (1.6%) had Grade 5 events of pneumonia, 1 patient (0.8%) had Grade 5 bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and 1 patient (0.8%) had cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia associated with Pneumocystis jirovecii. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection before and after ABECMA infusion and treat appropriately. Administer prophylactic, preemptive, and/or therapeutic antimicrobials according to standard institutional guidelines.

Febrile neutropenia was observed in 16% (20/127) of patients after ABECMA infusion and may be concurrent with CRS. In the event of febrile neutropenia, evaluate for infection and manage with broad spectrum antibiotics, fluids, and other supportive care as medically indicated.

Viral Reactivation: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection resulting in pneumonia and death has occurred following ABECMA administration. Monitor and treat for CMV reactivation in accordance with clinical guidelines. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death, can occur in patients treated with drugs directed against plasma cells. Perform screening for CMV, HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in accordance with clinical guidelines before collection of cells for manufacturing.

Prolonged Cytopenias: Patients may exhibit prolonged cytopenias following lymphodepleting chemotherapy and ABECMA infusion. In the KarMMa study, 41% of patients (52/127) experienced prolonged Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and 49% (62/127) experienced prolonged Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia that had not resolved by Month 1 following ABECMA infusion. Rate of prolonged neutropenia was 49% in the 450 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort and 34% in the 300 x 106 CAR+ T cell dose cohort. In 83% (43/52) of patients who recovered from Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia after Month 1, the median time to recovery from ABECMA infusion was 1.9 months. In 65% (40/62) of patients who recovered from Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia, the median time to recovery was 2.1 months. Median time to cytopenia recovery was similar across the 300 and 450 x 106 dose cohort.

Three patients underwent stem cell therapy for hematopoietic reconstitution due to prolonged cytopenia. Two of the three patients died from complications of prolonged cytopenia. Monitor blood counts prior to and after ABECMA infusion. Manage cytopenia with myeloid growth factor and blood product transfusion support according to institutional guidelines.

Hypogammaglobulinemia: Plasma cell aplasia and hypogammaglobulinemia can occur in patients receiving treatment with ABECMA. Hypogammaglobulinemia was reported as an adverse event in 21% (27/127) of patients; laboratory IgG levels fell below 500 mg/dl after infusion in 25% (32/127) of patients treated with ABECMA.

Monitor immunoglobulin levels after treatment with ABECMA and administer IVIG for IgG <400 mg/dl. Manage per local institutional guidelines, including infection precautions and antibiotic or antiviral prophylaxis.

The safety of immunization with live viral vaccines during or following ABECMA treatment has not been studied. Vaccination with live virus vaccines is not recommended for at least 6 weeks prior to the start of lymphodepleting chemotherapy, during ABECMA treatment, and until immune recovery following treatment with ABECMA.

Secondary Malignancies: Patients treated with ABECMA may develop secondary malignancies. Monitor life-long for secondary malignancies. If a secondary malignancy occurs, contact Bristol Myers Squibb at 1-888-805-4555 to obtain instructions on patient samples to collect for testing of secondary malignancy of T cell origin.

Effects on Ability to Drive and Operate Machinery: Due to the potential for neurologic events, including altered mental status or seizures, patients receiving ABECMA are at risk for altered or decreased consciousness or coordination in the 8 weeks following ABECMA infusion. Advise patients to refrain from driving and engaging in hazardous occupations or activities, such as operating heavy or potentially dangerous machinery, during this initial period.

Adverse Reactions: The most common nonlaboratory adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 20%) include CRS, infections – pathogen unspecified, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, hypogammaglobulinemia, diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infection, nausea, viral infections, encephalopathy, edema, pyrexia, cough, headache, and decreased appetite.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

REBLOZYL Indications

REBLOZYL (luspatercept) is indicated for the treatment of anemia in adult patients with beta thalassemia who require regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusions

REBLOZYL is indicated for the treatment of anemia failing an erythropoiesis stimulating agent and requiring 2 or more red blood cell units over 8 weeks in adult patients with very low- to intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS) or with myelodysplastic/ myeloproliferative neoplasm with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis (MDS/MPN-RS-T)

REBLOZYL is not indicated for use as a substitute for RBC transfusions in patients who require immediate correction of anemia

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Thrombosis/Thromboembolism

In adult patients with beta thalassemia, thromboembolic events (TEE) were reported in 8/223 (3.6%) REBLOZYL-treated patients. TEEs included deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, portal vein thrombosis, and ischemic stroke. Patients with known risk factors for thromboembolism (splenectomy or concomitant use of hormone replacement therapy) may be at further increased risk of thromboembolic conditions. Consider thromboprophylaxis in patients at increased risk of TEE. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of thromboembolic events and institute treatment promptly.

Hypertension

Hypertension was reported in 10.7% (61/571) of REBLOZYL-treated patients. Across clinical studies, the incidence of Grade 3 to 4 hypertension ranged from 1.8% to 8.6%. In patients with beta thalassemia with normal baseline blood pressure, 13 (6.2%) patients developed systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥130 mm Hg and 33 (16.6%) patients developed diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥80 mm Hg. In adult patients with MDS with normal baseline blood pressure, 26 (29.9%) patients developed SBP ≥130 mm Hg and 23 (16.4%) patients developed DBP ≥80 mm Hg. Monitor blood pressure prior to each administration. Manage new or exacerbations of preexisting hypertension using anti-hypertensive agents.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

REBLOZYL may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. REBLOZYL caused increased post-implantation loss, decreased litter size, and an increased incidence of skeletal variations in pregnant rat and rabbit studies. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 3 months after the final dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Beta-Thalassemia

  • Serious adverse reactions occurred in 3.6% of patients on REBLOZYL. Serious adverse reactions occurring in 1% of patients included cerebrovascular accident and deep vein thrombosis. A fatal adverse reaction occurred in 1 patient treated with REBLOZYL who died due to an unconfirmed case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)
  • Most common adverse reactions (at least 10% for REBLOZYL and 1% more than placebo) were headache (26% vs 24%), bone pain (20% vs 8%), arthralgia (19% vs 12%), fatigue (14% vs 13%), cough (14% vs 11%), abdominal pain (14% vs 12%), diarrhea (12% vs 10%) and dizziness (11% vs 5%)

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  • Grade >3 (≥2%) adverse reactions included fatigue, hypertension, syncope and musculoskeletal pain. A fatal adverse reaction occurred in 5 (2.1%) patients
  • The most common (≥10%) adverse reactions included fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, dizziness, diarrhea, nausea, hypersensitivity reactions, hypertension, headache, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, and urinary tract infection

LACTATION

It is not known whether REBLOZYL is excreted into human milk or absorbed systemically after ingestion by a nursing infant. REBLOZYL was detected in milk of lactating rats. When a drug is present in animal milk, it is likely that the drug will be present in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, and because of the unknown effects of REBLOZYL in infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue treatment. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in the breastfed child, breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment and for 3 months after the last dose.

Please see full Prescribing Information for REBLOZYL.

INREBIC U.S. INDICATION

INREBIC® (fedratinib) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis (MF).

U.S. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

BOXED WARNING: ENCEPHALOPATHY INCLUDING WERNICKE’S
Serious and fatal encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s, has occurred in patients treated with INREBIC. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a neurologic emergency. Assess thiamine levels in all patients prior to starting INREBIC, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Do not start INREBIC in patients with thiamine deficiency; replete thiamine prior to treatment initiation. If encephalopathy is suspected, immediately discontinue INREBIC and initiate parenteral thiamine. Monitor until symptoms resolve or improve and thiamine levels normalize.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s: Serious and fatal encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s encephalopathy, has occurred in INREBIC-treated patients. Serious cases were reported in 1.3% (8/608) of patients treated with INREBIC in clinical trials and 0.16% (1/608) of cases were fatal.

Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a neurologic emergency resulting from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Signs and symptoms of Wernicke’s encephalopathy may include ataxia, mental status changes, and ophthalmoplegia (e.g., nystagmus, diplopia). Any change in mental status, confusion, or memory impairment should raise concern for potential encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s, and prompt a full evaluation including a neurologic examination, assessment of thiamine levels, and imaging. Assess thiamine levels in all patients prior to starting INREBIC, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Do not start INREBIC in patients with thiamine deficiency; replete thiamine prior to treatment initiation. If encephalopathy is suspected, immediately discontinue INREBIC and initiate parenteral thiamine. Monitor until symptoms resolve or improve and thiamine levels normalize.

Anemia: New or worsening Grade 3 anemia occurred in 34% of INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of the first Grade 3 anemia was approximately 2 months, with 75% of cases occurring within 3 months. Mean hemoglobin levels reached nadir after 12 to 16 weeks with partial recovery and stabilization after 16 weeks. Red blood cell transfusions were received by 51% of INREBIC-treated patients and permanent discontinuation of INREBIC occurred due to anemia in 1% of patients. Consider dose reduction for patients who become red blood cell transfusion dependent.

Thrombocytopenia: New or worsening Grade ≥3 thrombocytopenia during the randomized treatment period occurred in 12% of INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of the first Grade 3 thrombocytopenia was approximately 1 month; with 75% of cases occurring within 4 months. Platelet transfusions were received by 3.1% of INREBIC-treated patients. Permanent discontinuation of treatment due to thrombocytopenia and bleeding that required clinical intervention both occurred in 2.1% of INREBIC-treated patients. Obtain a complete blood count (CBC) at baseline, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 thrombocytopenia with active bleeding or Grade 4 thrombocytopenia, interrupt INREBIC until resolved to less than or equal to Grade 2 or baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose and monitor platelets as clinically indicated.

Gastrointestinal Toxicity: Gastrointestinal toxicities are the most frequent adverse reactions in INREBIC-treated patients. During the randomized treatment period, diarrhea occurred in 66% of patients, nausea in 62% of patients, and vomiting in 39% of patients. Grade 3 diarrhea 5% and vomiting 3.1% occurred. The median time to onset of any grade nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea was 1 day, with 75% of cases occurring within 2 weeks of treatment. Consider providing appropriate prophylactic anti-emetic therapy (e.g., 5-HT3 receptor antagonists) during INREBIC treatment. Treat diarrhea with anti-diarrheal medications promptly at the first onset of symptoms. Grade 3 or higher nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea not responsive to supportive measures within 48 hours, interrupt INREBIC until resolved to Grade 1 or less or baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose. Monitor thiamine levels and replete as needed.

Hepatic Toxicity: Elevations of ALT and AST (all grades) during the randomized treatment period occurred in 43% and 40%, respectively, with Grade 3 or 4 in 1% and 0%, respectively, of INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of any grade transaminase elevation was approximately 1 month, with 75% of cases occurring within 3 months. Monitor hepatic function at baseline, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 or higher ALT and/or AST elevations (greater than 5 × ULN), interrupt INREBIC dose until resolved to Grade 1 or less or to baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose. If re-occurrence of a Grade 3 or higher elevation of ALT/AST, discontinue treatment with INREBIC.

Amylase and Lipase Elevation: Grade 3 or higher amylase 2% and/or lipase 10% elevations developed in INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of any grade amylase or lipase elevation was 15 days, with 75% of cases occurring within 1 month of starting treatment. One patient developed pancreatitis in the fedratinib clinical development program (n=608) and pancreatitis resolved with treatment discontinuation. Monitor amylase and lipase at baseline, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 or higher amylase and/or lipase elevations, interrupt INREBIC until resolved to Grade 1 or less or to baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS:

The most common adverse reactions for INREBIC treated vs. placebo were diarrhea (66% vs. 16%), nausea (62% vs. 15%), anemia (40% vs. 14%), and vomiting (39% vs. 5%). Dosage interruptions due to an adverse reaction during the randomized treatment period occurred in 21% of patients who received INREBIC. Adverse reactions requiring dosage interruption in >3% of patients who received INREBIC included diarrhea and nausea. Dosage reductions due to an adverse reaction during the randomized treatment period occurred in 19% of patients who received INREBIC. Adverse reactions requiring dosage reduction in >2% of patients who received INREBIC included anemia (6%), diarrhea (3%), vomiting (3%), and thrombocytopenia (2%).

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

Coadministration of INREBIC with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor increases fedratinib exposure. Increased exposure may increase the risk of adverse reactions. Consider alternative therapies that do not strongly inhibit CYP3A4 activity. Alternatively, reduce the dose of INREBIC when administering with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Avoid INREBIC with strong and moderate CYP3A4 inducers. Avoid INREBIC with dual CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 inhibitor. Coadministration of INREBIC with drugs that are CYP3A4 substrates, CYP2C19 substrates, or CYP2D6 substrates increases the concentrations of these drugs, which may increase the risk of adverse reactions of these drugs. Monitor for adverse reactions and adjust the dose of drugs that are CYP3A4, CYP2C19, or CYP2D6 substrates as necessary when coadministered with INREBIC.

PREGNANCY/LACTATION: Consider the benefits and risks of INREBIC for the mother and possible risks to the fetus when prescribing INREBIC to a pregnant woman. Due to the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise patients not to breastfeed during treatment with INREBIC, and for at least 1 month after the last dose.

RENAL IMPAIRMENT: Reduce INREBIC dose when administered to patients with severe renal impairment. No modification of the starting dose is recommended for patients with mild to moderate renal impairment. Due to potential increase of exposure, patients with preexisting moderate renal impairment require more intensive safety monitoring, and if necessary, dose modifications based on adverse reactions.

HEPATIC IMPAIRMENT: Avoid use of INREBIC in patients with severe hepatic impairment.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNING, and Summary of Product Characteristics for INREBIC.

ONUREG U.S. Indication

ONUREG® (azacitidine tablets) is approved in the U.S. for continued treatment of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia who achieved first complete remission (CR) or complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) following intensive induction chemotherapy and are not able to complete intensive curative therapy.

U.S. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • ONUREG is contraindicated in patients with known severe hypersensitivity to azacitidine or its components.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

  • Risks of Substitution with Other Azacitidine Products: Due to substantial differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters, the recommended dose and schedule for ONUREG are different from those for the intravenous or subcutaneous azacitidine products. Treatment of patients using intravenous or subcutaneous azacitidine at the recommended dosage of ONUREG may result in a fatal adverse reaction. Treatment with ONUREG at the doses recommended for intravenous or subcutaneous azacitidine may not be effective. Do not substitute ONUREG for intravenous or subcutaneous azacitidine.
  • Myelosuppression: New or worsening Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 49% and 22% of patients who received ONUREG. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 12%. A dose reduction was required for 7% and 2% of patients due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Less than 1% of patients discontinued ONUREG due to either neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Monitor complete blood counts and modify the dosage as recommended. Provide standard supportive care, including hematopoietic growth factors, if myelosuppression occurs.
  • Increased Early Mortality in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS): In AZA-MDS-003, 216 patients with red blood cell transfusion-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia due to MDS were randomized to ONUREG or placebo. 107 received a median of 5 cycles of ONUREG 300 mg daily for 21 days of a 28-day cycle. Enrollment was discontinued early due to a higher incidence of early fatal and/or serious adverse reactions in the ONUREG arm compared with placebo. The most frequent fatal adverse reaction was sepsis. Safety and effectiveness of ONUREG for MDS have not been established. Treatment of MDS with ONUREG is not recommended outside of controlled trials.
  • Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: ONUREG can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Azacitidine caused fetal death and anomalies in pregnant rats via a single intraperitoneal dose less than the recommended human daily dose of oral azacitidine on a mg/m2 basis. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ONUREG and for at least 6 months after the last dose. Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ONUREG and for at least 3 months after the last dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • Serious adverse reactions occurred in 15% of patients who received ONUREG. Serious adverse reactions in ≥2% included pneumonia (8%) and febrile neutropenia (7%). One fatal adverse reaction (sepsis) occurred in a patient who received ONUREG.
  • Most common (≥10%) adverse reactions with ONUREG vs placebo were nausea (65%, 24%), vomiting (60%, 10%), diarrhea (50%, 21%), fatigue/asthenia (44%, 25%), constipation (39%, 24%), pneumonia (27%, 17%), abdominal pain (22%, 13%), arthralgia (14%, 10%), decreased appetite (13%, 6%), febrile neutropenia (12%, 8%), dizziness (11%, 9%), pain in extremity (11%, 5%).

LACTATION

  • There are no data regarding the presence of azacitidine in human milk or the effects on the breastfed child or milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in the breastfed child, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with ONUREG and for 1 week after the last dose

Please see full Prescribing Information for ONUREG.

About the Bristol Myers Squibb and Ono Pharmaceutical Collaboration

In 2011, through a collaboration agreement with Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Bristol Myers Squibb expanded its territorial rights to develop and commercialize Opdivo globally, except in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, where Ono had retained all rights to the compound at the time. On July 23, 2014, Ono and Bristol Myers Squibb further expanded the companies’ strategic collaboration agreement to jointly develop and commercialize multiple immunotherapies – as single agents and combination regimens – for patients with cancer in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

About Bristol Myers Squibb

Bristol Myers Squibb is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases. For more information about Bristol Myers Squibb, visit us at BMS.com or follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram.

Celgene and Juno Therapeutics are wholly owned subsidiaries of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. In certain countries outside the U.S., due to local laws, Celgene and Juno Therapeutics are referred to as, Celgene, a Bristol Myers Squibb company and Juno Therapeutics, a Bristol Myers Squibb company.

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding, among other things, the research, development and commercialization of pharmaceutical products. All statements that are not statements of historical facts are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are based on historical performance and current expectations and projections about our future financial results, goals, plans and objectives and involve inherent risks, assumptions and uncertainties, including internal or external factors that could delay, divert or change any of them in the next several years, that are difficult to predict, may be beyond our control and could cause our future financial results, goals, plans and objectives to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, the statements. These risks, assumptions, uncertainties and other factors include, among others, that future study results will be consistent with the results to date, that the treatments and combination treatments may not receive regulatory approval for the indications described in this release in the currently anticipated timeline or at all and, if approved, whether such treatments or combination treatments for such indications described in this release will be commercially successful. No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed. Forward-looking statements in this press release should be evaluated together with the many risks and uncertainties that affect Bristol Myers Squibb’s business and market, particularly those identified in the cautionary statement and risk factors discussion in Bristol Myers Squibb’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, as updated by our subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The forward-looking statements included in this document are made only as of the date of this document and except as otherwise required by applicable law, Bristol Myers Squibb undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events, changed circumstances or otherwise.

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Contacts

Bristol Myers Squibb

Media Inquiries:
Media@BMS.com

Investors:
Tim Power
609-252-7509
timothy.power@bms.com

Nina Goworek
908-673-9711
nina.goworek@bms.com

Release Summary

BMS Presents New Research at ASCO & EHA 2021

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Contacts

Bristol Myers Squibb

Media Inquiries:
Media@BMS.com

Investors:
Tim Power
609-252-7509
timothy.power@bms.com

Nina Goworek
908-673-9711
nina.goworek@bms.com