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TeenBusiness.com : Real Stories about Teen Entrepreneurs Shatter App-Builder Stereotype

WEST ORANGE, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--According to TeenBusiness.com, the media’s focus on teen app developers and coders doesn’t tell the full story of young entrepreneurs. Yes, examples like Nick D’Aloisio, who reportedly made $30 million by selling a news summary app called Summly to Yahoo!, do exist.

“I started Origami Owl with $350 and a simple dream in mind—getting a car on my 16th birthday. So, with all of my babysitting money and my family’s support, I set out to start my own business and created Origami Owl”

However, despite the handful of successful high-tech and web start-ups, teens are starting low-tech, green, and science-based enterprises in the US and around the world in far greater numbers. Unbound by the restrictions of the adult mind, young people are doing innovative things – sometimes motivated by the desire to make money or the goal to improve lives.

TeenBusiness.com chronicles the diverse range of teen entrepreneurs, investors, and inventors. Here are a few examples of young entrepreneurs and inventors the site recently featured:

  • Bella Weems, a teenager from Arizona, US is approaching revenues of over $250 million this year with her own jewelry business, Origami Owl.
  • At 17 years old, Avani Singh of New Delhi, India founded Ummeed – a program that trains women from the slums of Delhi to become electric-powered rickshaw taxi drivers to help support their families.
  • 15-year-old Nicole Ticea from Vancouver, Canada devised an early-stage HIV test that analyzes a pinprick of blood to indicate whether someone has recently been infected with the potentially deadly virus.
  • Andrew Mupuy from Kasokoso, Uganda started his eco-friendly paper bag manufacturing business, Youth Entrepreneurial Link Investments, at age 16 after learning of the environmental hazards of plastic bags; he now employs about 20 people.

“I started Origami Owl with $350 and a simple dream in mind—getting a car on my 16th birthday. So, with all of my babysitting money and my family’s support, I set out to start my own business and created Origami Owl,” said Bella Weems whose company will make revenues of about a quarter of a billion USD this year.

Carter Kostler, a 15-year-old from Virginia in the US who was featured as a guest on ABC Television’s Shark Tank, had a different motivation for starting his own business. He was concerned about the youth obesity epidemic caused by the consumption of sugary drinks.

According to Nkem Modu, who manages this first of its kind global resource, “There are so many inspiring stories about teens exploring their hobbies and talents and turning them into businesses. It’s exciting to discover and share their experiences and motivate others.” Much more than providing inspiration for other teens, the site contains a wealth of learning guides and videos.

About TeenBusiness.com
TeenBusiness.com is the global resource for teen entrepreneurs, investors, and inventors. Formerly known as TeenVestor.com, it is the first website that covers both youth entrepreneurship and investing through creating and curating essential resources for its growing audience. The Wall Street Journal recommends the site as one of the best sites for teen entrepreneurs.

Contacts

TeenBusiness.com
Andrea Walker, 973-986-4781
teenbusiness@gmail.com
Twitter: @teenmogul