New Industry-wide Survey of Emerging Trends in Parking Finds Technology Still Driving the Industry, with Sustainability a Key Focus

Industry-transforming innovations are changing the way we park. Half of top ten trends focus on technology; increased demand for customer service and greater collaboration between parking, transportation, and planning decision makers also cited

PHOENIX--()--According to the results of an industry-wide research survey conducted by the International Parking Institute, technology-related innovations account for three of the top five trends in today’s $30 billion parking industry. Among them, cashless, electronic, and automatic payment systems; real-time information about parking rates and availability via mobile apps; and wireless sensing devices for improved traffic and transportation management.

“Parking today is about mobility and connectivity,” said Casey Jones, CAPP, chairman of the International Parking Institute (IPI), the world’s largest association representing the parking industry. Jones shared results of the 2012 Emerging Trends in Parking Survey, at the IPI Conference & Expo in Phoenix, Ariz. this week.

Jones says research results reflect the demand for technology, sustainability, revenue-generation, and customer service that are converging to earn the industry new respect from Wall Street, Silicon Valley, and every drivable place in between, as forward-thinking planners realize that parking matters to the design of more livable communities and to broader transportation issues.

More than one-third of those surveyed see the demand for sustainable solutions as a top trend affecting the parking profession. Jones said it is estimated that about 30 percent of the cars circling a city at any given time are doing so as drivers look for parking. Those cars are creating traffic congestion – viewed by survey respondents as being the single most significant societal change affecting the parking industry. From an environmental standpoint, that translates to incalculable amounts of wasted fuel and carbon emissions.

Two trends that moved up the list compared to last year were increased demand for customer service and increased demand for greater collaboration between parking, transportation and planning decision makers.

Demand for greater parking revenue dropped in the rankings.

Survey results showed a dead heat between urban planners, local government officials, and architects among those parking professionals believe most need to better understand parking.

When asked where parking would best fit as a course of study at an academic institution, nearly half of respondents suggested that parking become part of the curriculum at schools for urban planners.

The 2012 Emerging Trends in Parking Survey was conducted online in May 2012 among parking professionals by the International Parking Institute (IPI). A complete report is available at www.parking.org/media/emerging-trends-in-parking.aspx. For more information, please visit www.parking.org.

Contacts

International Parking Institute
Helen Sullivan, 703.606.7622
sullivan@parking.org

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Contacts

International Parking Institute
Helen Sullivan, 703.606.7622
sullivan@parking.org