Valve Function Shows Improvement With Corazon's New Demineralizing Technology; U.S. Trials Set To Begin Before Year's End; Company is Currently Developing Beating Heart Technology

MENLO PARK, Calif.--()--Sept. 24, 2004--Corazon Technologies Inc., developer of an innovative method for removing calcium from aortic valves, reported results from its initial human clinical trials. These data will be presented Thursday September 29th at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) meeting in Washington, D.C. Patients treated with the company's stopped-heart system benefited from improved aortic valve function with structural preservation. This improvement was tracked throughout the 6-month follow-up period. The study concluded that in-situ demineralization may be a safe and effective repair method for calcified, stenotic aortic valves. Larger studies are planned in order to determine the safety and effectiveness of the device.

Corazon's demineralization technology is uniquely positioned to improve native valve function. The company is now expanding its application to be used as an enabling treatment for valve replacement by demineralization of the implantation site prior to valve replacement. The Corazon technology is anticipated to facilitate aortic valve replacement and improve outcomes, including implant durability. In addition, both applications are being incorporated into a beating heart platform. It is believed this beating heart platform will allow clinicians to perform valve repairs or enable valve replacements either percutaneously or surgically. The beating heart system is planned for clinical evaluation during the first half of 2005.

"We are pleased with the early results from our International study," said Geoffrey Dillon, President and CEO of Corazon Technologies, Inc. "We have made tremendous progress in advancing the technology associated with valve repair. We are now beginning to move from our very promising early stage results to positioning the company for beating heart valve repair and enabling technologies for percutaneous valve replacement."

Corazon has been granted an IDE by the FDA for its stopped-heart device in the United States. U.S. clinical trials are expected to begin before year's end, and will occur in three sites, including The Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland; Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston; and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

"Percutaneous heart valve replacement is in the future, and Corazon's technology has the potential to enable these procedures," says the Cleveland Clinic heart-valve surgeon and CEO, Dr. Delos M. "Toby" Cosgrove. "Currently surgeons debride and prepare the site for valve implantation during open chest procedures. Demineralization of the valve prior to percutaneous aortic valve replacement may help eliminate some of the shortcomings of this procedure."

About Corazon:

Corazon Technologies, Inc. is an emerging medical device company focused on the treatment of calcific cardiovascular tissue and is developing proprietary devices that improve native valve performance by demineralizing calcific tissue. Corazon's unique demineralization technology is the only treatment positioned to restore native valve function by repairing diseased tissue. Corazon technology may create a new treatment option for heart valve patients with mild-to-moderate stenotic disease.

Contacts

Corazon Technologies Inc.
Geoffrey Dillon, 650-813-5240 x212
geoff@Corazon-inc.com

Contacts

Corazon Technologies Inc.
Geoffrey Dillon, 650-813-5240 x212
geoff@Corazon-inc.com