12-Year-Old Record-Breaking Mountaineer Tyler Armstrong Sets Sights on Summit #4 - Australia’s Mt. Kosciuszko to Raise Funds for CureDuchenne

-- Permit Waiver for Mt. Everest Was Not Granted by the Chinese Government –

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif.--()--In his quest to climb the Seven Summits to help raise awareness and help CureDuchenne find a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, record-breaking mountaineer Tyler Armstrong has now set his sights on Mt. Kosciuszko, Australia’s highest peak, as his fourth summit.

Armstrong’s guides applied for a permit to climb the north side of Mt. Everest this spring but did not receive an exception from the age restriction recently set by the Chinese government.

Armstrong has successfully climbed three of the seven summits, including completing Mt. Kilimanjaro at age 8, Mt. Aconcagua in Argentina at age 9, the youngest person to summit this mountain, and Mt. Elbrus in Russia, which he completed last summer. At 7,310 feet, Mt. Kosciusko is the lowest of the seven summits.

In December, Armstrong climbed Mt. Cayambe in Ecuador and last week he completed a training climb on Mt. Broken Top in the Oregon Cascades.

Armstrong began climbing for boys with Duchenne several years ago after he met boys with the genetic disease that causes muscle degeneration. The contrast of their challenges continues to motivate the young mountaineer. Boys with Duchenne grow weaker as they get older and exercise is detrimental, while Tyler gets stronger with every workout and climb.

“Tyler is excited to continue his quest for the seven summits. We are looking forward to visiting boys with Duchenne in Australia and climbing Mt. Kosciusko in their honor,” said Kevin Armstrong, Tyler’s dad.

Mountains of Courage

Boys and families who live with Duchenne face daily struggles with the degenerative disease that slowly robs patients of their ability to walk. Most boys lose their ability to walk by their mid-teens and this genetic disease claims their lives by their mid-20s. There are about 300,000 boys around the world who have Duchenne. In each place where Tyler climbs he meets and befriends boys with Duchenne. He admires their courage in the face of this devastating disease and climbs in their honor. (Here’s a video about Tyler and a boy with Duchenne in Ecuador.)

While today there is no cure, there is hope. For the first time there are experimental medications in clinical trials, and one treatment is currently being considered by the FDA.

“Tyler inspires us with his determination and his courage to tackle the world’s largest mountains for boys who will never be able to do what he does. For every boy with Duchenne, we will not stop until there is a cure,” said Debra Miller, Founder and CEO of CureDuchenne.

To support Tyler and the Climb to Cure Duchenne, please visit crowdrise.com/climbtocureduchenne.

CureDuchenne was founded in 2003 with a focus on saving the lives of those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a disease that affects more than 300,000 boys worldwide. For more information, please visit CureDuchenne.org and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Contacts

for CureDuchenne
Barbara Caruso, 714/841-6777
mobile: 714/328-3273
barbara@c-squaredpr.com

Contacts

for CureDuchenne
Barbara Caruso, 714/841-6777
mobile: 714/328-3273
barbara@c-squaredpr.com