Adaptive Biotechnologies and Collaborators Demonstrate Value of Immunosequencing for Diagnosis of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

SEATTLE--()--Adaptive Biotechnologies and collaborators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital today announced publication of a study demonstrating that the company’s revolutionary immunosequencing platform, which utilizes next-generation sequencing and advanced bioinformatics to sensitively profile all of the T cells in a biological sample, adds value in delivering more definitive diagnoses of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).

CTCL is a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that arises in T cells that traffic through the skin. Diagnosis is based on several factors including clinical presentation, histopathology and, critically, identification of a clonal T-cell population in blood or skin lesions. The most commonly used clinical assay for detecting clonal T-cell populations, however, has a significant false negative rate.

“Using current methods, it takes on average six years for patients to receive a definitive CTCL diagnosis,” said Rachael Clark, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, co-senior author of the study. “As a result, appropriate therapy is delayed, often until the disease worsens to the point where diagnosis is clear but effective treatment is more difficult.”

The new study, published today in Science Translational Medicine, showed that Adaptive’s technology detected a high-frequency T-cell clone in 100 percent of confirmed CTCL patients and could successfully discriminate CTCL from benign inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis and contact dermatitis. The sequencing-based method was also able to distinguish early CTCL recurrence from benign inflammation, as well as detect CTCL cells in the blood of patients in which the disease had spread.

“These results demonstrate that, compared to current methods, Adaptive’s immunosequencing technology offers a more sensitive and specific method for discriminating between CTCL and benign inflammatory skin disease,” said Ilan “Lanny” Kirsch, M.D., Senior Vice President, Translational Medicine at Adaptive Biotechnologies, and lead author of the study. “Leaders in the field have already begun to apply this technology to the care of CTCL patients. In the coming months we plan to expand our clinical service so that it can be used in the diagnosis and care of even more patients.”

In a separate study published online ahead of print in Blood in July, Adaptive’s technology was used to evaluate the efficacy of resiquimod gel, an experimental topical therapy for CTCL. Immunosequencing, by virtue of its ability to directly measure the number of malignant T cells in skin, was shown to be useful in assessing responses of skin lesions to therapy. The technique was also found to be more specific than traditional clinical scores.

“TCR sequencing facilitates diagnosis and identifies mature T cells as the cell of origin in CTCL,” by Kirsch, et al., was published on October 7 in Science Translational Medicine.

“Topical resiquimod can induce disease regression, eradicate malignant T cells and enhance T cell effector functions in cutaneous T cell lymphoma,” by Rook, et al., was published online ahead of print in Blood on July 30.

About Adaptive Biotechnologies®

Adaptive Biotechnologies is the pioneer and leader in combining high-throughput sequencing and expert bioinformatics to profile T-cell and B-cell receptors. Adaptive is bringing the accuracy and sensitivity of its immunosequencing platform into laboratories around the world to drive groundbreaking research in cancer and other immune-mediated diseases. Adaptive also translates immunosequencing discoveries into clinical diagnostics and therapeutic development to improve patient care.

Contacts

Adaptive Biotechnologies
Sylvia Zaich, 650-243-3949
media@adaptivebiotech.com

Contacts

Adaptive Biotechnologies
Sylvia Zaich, 650-243-3949
media@adaptivebiotech.com