Research and Markets: Graphene for Supercapacitors: Applications and Markets 2014

DUBLIN--()--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/dspvlx/graphene_for) has announced the addition of the "Graphene for Supercapacitors: Applications and Markets" report to their offering.

Almost from the moment graphene was first successfully synthesized back in 2004, researchers around the world have envisioned its use for the electrodes of supercapacitors.

Supercapacitors, or ultracapacitors, or for the more technically inclined, electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), are a kind of hybrid between a capacitor and electrochemical batteries, like lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. They can deliver an enormous amount of power very quickly, a capability known as power density (the maximum amount of power that can be supplied per unit mass), like a capacitor. But unlike capacitors, they can store that power for longer, a capability known as energy density (the amount of energy stored per unit mass).

In order for supercapacitors to store more electricity to start approaching the energy density of an electrochemical battery you need to increase the surface area of the electrodes. It is here on the electrodes that the electrical charge is stored via something akin to static electricity. The more surface area you can give the electrodes, the more electricity can be stored in the supercapacitor.

While research continues to see if graphene can be used to produce the long charge times for supercapacitors so sought after by all-electric vehicle enthusiasts, graphene does have other properties that could prove to be very attractive for other applications. For one, its high electrical conductivity is significantly better than activated carbon, which could open up applications in electronics. It also can be made into a structure unlike activated carbon, which is just sort of lumped together. With its ability to be structured, graphene has another attractive property for electronic applications in which it could be designed into electronic components.

This report looks at the strengths and weaknesses of graphene in supercapacitor applications and how those stack up against established materials and other potential materials being experimented with for supercapacitor applications.

To accomplish this aim, this report looks at how supercapacitors are currently produced, who produces them and who among those producers appear to taking the prospects of graphene seriously. We also look at graphene manufacturing and the methods are best suited for leading to a material for the electrodes of supercapacitors.

Key Topics Covered:

  1. Companies Mentioned In his Report
  2. Introduction
  3. Key Findings
  4. Background
  5. Ten-Year Market Forecast For the Overall Supercapacitor Industry
  6. Segmentation of the supercapacitor industry
  7. Applications In Each Category
  8. List of electrode materials used in supercapacitors
  9. Insights into supercapacitor bill of materials (BoM) cost structure
  10. Manufacturing methods
  11. Preferred form of graphene for supercapacitors
  12. Analysis of key points-of-pain and what graphene composite material would have to achieve to solve these
  13. Key challenges facing graphene uptake in the supercapacitor industry

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/dspvlx/graphene_for

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Sector: Computing and Technology

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Sector: Computing and Technology