DecImmune Therapeutics Awarded $3 Million in SBIR Phase IIB Funding

Funding to Support First Human Clinical Studies of Monoclonal Therapeutic for Range of Vascular Inflammatory Diseases

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--()--DecImmune Therapeutics today announced that it has been awarded a $3 million, three-year Phase II SBIR grant to support late preclinical studies and initial clinical trials of DeciMab™, its novel monoclonal therapeutic in development for the treatment of the vascular inflammatory diseases. With this grant, DecImmune has now been awarded $7 million in SBIR funding to accelerate DeciMab’s development.

DeciMab targets a novel innate autoimmune pathway that arises in large and small vessels following a wide range of insults including hyperglycemia, ischemia in sickle cell disease and heart attacks, and in chemotherapeutic cardiotoxicities. If not checked at the outset by DeciMab, localized inflammation can lead to tissue scarring that permanently compromises organ function. DecImmune has demonstrated preclinical proof-of-concept with DeciMab, showing in small and large animals that a single dose of DeciMab immediately following a heart attack prevents significant cardiac tissue damage and enables pumping efficiency to continue at near normal levels three weeks later. The grant announced today is supporting continued development for the prevention of heart failure post heart attack.

“DeciMab represents a highly innovative approach with potential to benefit millions of patients who are at risk of organ function loss,” said Walter Newman, PhD, CSO of DecImmune. “This highly competitive award recognizes the strength of our core science and the progress our team has made in developing DeciMab. The grant will help enable DecImmune to complete the work necessary to begin human safety and tolerability studies in 2016.”

About the DecImmune Therapeutics and the N2 Pathway
DecImmune Therapeutics is developing a novel monoclonal antibody, DeciMab™, aimed at preventing tissue damage and preserving organ function in a range of vascular inflammatory diseases. Our approach is based on the discovery of an innate IgM-mediated auto-immune pathway that is triggered by vascular injury in conditions such as diabetic nephropathy, sickle cell disease, and myocardial infarction. This pathway, dubbed N2, can initiate a cascade of tissue damaging events leading to loss of organ function.

DecImmune Therapeutics has received financing from HealthCare Ventures, Amgen Ventures, Astellas Venture Management and Broadview Ventures, in addition to $7 million in NIH SBIR grant funding. DecImmune Therapeutics was founded by Michael Carroll PhD (Boston Childrens’ Hospital, Harvard Medical School), and Francis Moore Jr. MD (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School), who discovered the N2 pathway.

Contacts

DecImmune:
Walter Newman, PhD, 617-225-0096 ext 2124
wnewman@hcven.com
www.Decimmune.com

Contacts

DecImmune:
Walter Newman, PhD, 617-225-0096 ext 2124
wnewman@hcven.com
www.Decimmune.com