Diamond Exhibit Extended at American Museum of Natural History in New York City

Scarselli's Olympia Diamond Collection Represents World's Rarest Natural Color Diamonds

NEW YORK--()--The Olympia Diamond Collection exhibit has been extended at the American Museum of Natural History because it has been well received. Originally scheduled to run from September 2009 to February 2010, the natural color diamonds will continue to be on display until further notice.

"There have only been two other important museum collections on colored diamonds. The Aurora Collection is a wonderful introduction to the world of fancy colors. The Splendor of Diamonds exhibit was an interesting display of large diamonds. But our exhibit showcases the best of the best, the strongest colors attainable in each color range," stated Bruno Scarselli, a leading authority in color diamonds. "While it might be the rarity and multimillion dollar value of these five gems that attracts people to the museum's Morgan Memorial Hall of Gems, it is the extraordinary beauty of these diamonds that thrills them. We want as many of the museum's four million yearly visitors as possible to have the opportunity to see the collection."

There are five diamonds in the Olympia Diamond Collection - blue-green, orange-yellow, purplish-pink, blue and orange. Each has been independently examined and graded by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) as 'vivid', the highest level of color saturation possible.

Ranging in size from 1.01 carats to 2.34 carats, they represent five of the strongest colors that naturally occur in a diamond.

"Diamonds are relatively pure gems composed of carbon atoms," explained Joshua Sheby of Scarselli Diamonds, and a former GIA-staff gemologist. "While forming, if nitrogen gets bonded to some of the carbon atoms, the diamond's resulting color will be yellow. If boron atoms, however, get mixed instead, the result is blue. Radiation can turn a diamond green and a shift in the lattice can create browns, pinks, reds and oranges. There are different shades within each color. The only place to experience this right now is at the American Museum of Natural History." Mr. Sheby, a recognized expert in the field of color diamonds, is the curator for the Olympia Diamond Collection.

Before Valentine's Day, the Scarselli red diamond was featured on The CBS Early Show (Friday, Feb. 12, 2010). Graded by the GIA as a fancy red, the 1.71 carat heart-cut, natural red color diamond is the largest one in the world, and has an estimated value of some $10 million.

Scarselli Diamonds, Inc. is a third-generation owned and operated business known for more than 80 years for its expertise in finding, cutting and polishing and manufacturing GIA-rated naturally color diamonds. To view the Scarselli Collection, go to: www.scarselli.com, or call 212/768-1877.

Contacts

SCA Communications, Inc.
Steve Cooper, 516-623-7615

Release Summary

Olympia Natural Color Diamond Collection from Scarselli continues on display at American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Contacts

SCA Communications, Inc.
Steve Cooper, 516-623-7615