Intel Opens 100th Computer Clubhouse; Milestone Achieved for Unique Learning Program Providing Life Skills for More than 50,000 Underserved Youth

WASHINGTON--()--May 16, 2005--Intel Corporation today opened the 100th Computer Clubhouse, a milestone for the unique, technology-based learning program which has served more than 50,000 youth since it began in 1993. Fueled by a $32 million investment by Intel in 2000, the Intel Computer Clubhouse Network has continued to grow to 100 around the world. "The Intel Computer Clubhouse Network offers youth access to computers, but its uniqueness lies in its learning model," said Intel CEO Craig Barrett. "At the Clubhouse, dedicated mentors guide and inspire youth to channel their creativity through technology in order to develop skills that can open doors to personal and professional achievement."

Computer Clubhouse members learn by doing. They create digital artwork; produce their own music CDs; film, write and edit their own short movies; and design Web sites. Most come to the Clubhouse knowing little about technology, and leave with the skills and self-confidence to succeed in today's technology-driven society.

Tom Rocc, a 20-year-old former member of the Intel Computer Clubhouse at Eastmont Computer Clubhouse in Oakland, Calif., was recently signed by Jive Records to a two-year recording contract. "I was always interested in music," said Rocc, "but before I came to the Computer Clubhouse, I didn't even know how to turn on a computer, let alone create a song on it. Then I heard myself on a CD and that inspired me to learn more."

The Intel Computer Clubhouse Network, the largest program of its kind, is a project of Museum of Science, Boston in collaboration with the MIT Media Laboratory. The Clubhouse program aims to reach youth living in underserved communities, especially girls and people of color, and engage them in developing technology skills at an early age. The Clubhouse serves youth 8 to 18. Fifty percent of Clubhouse members are between 13 and 18 years of age, and 43 percent are girls. More than 20 Computer Clubhouses have girls-only programs on selected days and hours to help build girls' confidence through technology.

Recent research conducted by SRI International indicates that the program is having an impact. Of Clubhouse members participating in a recent survey, 89 percent actively participate in complex design projects, and youth who stay longer and spend the most time on the computers show strong positive outcomes on measures such as sense of belonging, sense of future, relationship with adults, and technical competence.

The 100th Clubhouse is located in Washington, D.C., inside the Boys & Girls Clubs FBR Branch at the Town Hall Education Arts & Recreation Campus.

About the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Washington

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Washington is the largest affiliate of Boys & Girls Clubs of America. BGCGW has been helping youth for 119 years, serving over 36,000 kids annually. From public schools to public housing, Clubs are designed to meet the needs of the communities served by BGCGW. Its mission is to help boys and girls of all backgrounds, with emphasis on youth at-risk, build confidence, develop character and acquire the needed skills to grow into productive, civic-minded, responsible adults. BGCGW staff and volunteers show kids how to turn their dreams into reality through planning, education and hard work.

About the Town Hall Education Arts & Recreation Campus (THEARC)

The Town Hall Education Arts & Recreation Campus brings the programs and services of cultural, health, recreation, and human development organizations to residents residing east of the Anacostia River in the Ward 8 region of the District of Columbia. THEARC, sponsored by the non-profit organization Building Bridges Across the River, along with the real estate developer William C. Smith Company, altered the artistic and recreational landscape of Anacostia through an 110,000-square-foot community campus which includes a 378-seat theatre, music and dance performance space; a large screen for motion pictures; and other artistic and recreational components. Programs provided at THEARC include the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington/FBR Branch, (where the Intel Computer Clubhouse is located), the Children's Health Project of DC, the Corcoran School of Art, and more.

About the Intel Computer Clubhouse Network

Intel provides financial, technical, career, and volunteer mentor support to proliferate the Intel Computer Clubhouse Network globally. Intel has invested $32 million over five years to sponsor 100 Intel Computer Clubhouses. In addition, Adobe Systems Incorporated, which provides the largest software donation, Autodesk, Corel, Macromedia and Procreate have committed more than $10 million in software and services to the Intel Computer Clubhouse Network. Other organizations involved include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, LEGO Systems and Haworth Inc.

The Intel Computer Clubhouse program is part of the Intel(R) Innovation in Education initiative, a collaboration with educators around the world to improve the quality of engineering, mathematics, science and technology education to help students develop the higher-level thinking skills they need to participate and succeed in a knowledge-based economy. For more information, visit www.intel.com/education.

Intel, the world's largest chip maker, is also a leading manufacturer of computer, networking and communications products. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom.

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Contacts

Intel Corporation
Gail Dundas, 503-816-2382
gail.dundas@intel.com
Jennifer Greeson, 202-626-4384
jennifer.l.greeson@intel.com

Contacts

Intel Corporation
Gail Dundas, 503-816-2382
gail.dundas@intel.com
Jennifer Greeson, 202-626-4384
jennifer.l.greeson@intel.com