Is Sugar the Next Tobacco? - This Report Covers the Campaign Against Sugar, Whether Nutrient Taxes Actually Work, and the Role of Reformulation In Delivering the Food of Tomorrow - Research and Markets

DUBLIN--()--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Is Sugar the Next Tobacco?" report to their offering.

This report covers the campaign against sugar, whether nutrient taxes actually work, and the role of reformulation in delivering the food of tomorrow.

Pressure to reduce sugar in food is growing. On the back of effective campaigning and the publication of new dietary advice by influential health bodies, sugar reduction has risen to the top of the dietary health agenda during the past three years. In response, governments across the world are introducing taxes designed principally to limit sugar consumption as a means of tackling rising obesity rates and other diet-related health issues.

So far, the majority of these measures have been targeted at sweetened soft drinks, but as the imposition of such taxes becomes more common, and particularly if those taxes already introduced produce positive health outcomes, policymakers may begin to extend these measures to food products containing high levels of sugar.

Extract: Much of the progress in salt was achieved by so-called reformulation by stealth, where salt levels in foods were quietly decreased over time, with consumers' palates quickly adjusting to each successive reduction. Emerging research into taste perceptions suggests this incremental approach may not work so effectively for sugar... In the face of these challenges, food companies are likely to increasingly explore process-based solutions that are designed to provide the same perceptions of sweetness to the consumer but with lower concentrations of sugar, by adapting the size, shape or density of sugar crystals.

This 33-page report outlines the four key questions that most food manufacturers will be asking:

- Why is sugar being singled-out?

- Is the issue about more than just calories?

- How can we reduce sugar consumption?

- What effect will taxation have?

Key Topics Covered:

Executive summary

Introduction

Part one: Why sugar?

- Dietary advice targets sugar

- Campaigner traction - AOS to childhood obesity strategy (COS)

- Childhood obesity strategy

- Stakeholder reaction

- Carrot and stick

Part two: More than just calories?

- Analogies with tobacco

- Consensus on government advice

- Current evidence justifies action

Part three: How to reduce sugar consumption?

- Functional properties

- Calorie parity

- Keep it clean

- Differing views on stealth

- The PHE view

- Process-based solutions

- Portion size and product mix crucial

Part four: Will taxation work?

- Focus on sugary soft drinks

- Spur to reformulation

- UK soft drinks levy

- To levy or to tax?

- Immediate response

- Impact on spending patterns

- Further evaluation critical

Conclusion

About

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/xxbm87/is_sugar_the_next

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Related Topics: Sugar and Sweeteners

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Related Topics: Sugar and Sweeteners