Planning for a Possible Sixth Year of Drought, Metropolitan Joins State to Offer 2017 Water Supply Outlook

Despite modest gains in water reserves last winter, Southern California remains in Water Supply Alert

LOS ANGELES--()--Metropolitan Water District of Southern California:

WHAT:   As the new water year in California begins, top officials from the Metropolitan Water District and state Department of Water Resources will provide a Southern California supply update for reporters and editors. Officials will outline plans to meet the region’s water needs heading into sixth year of record drought.
 
WHEN:

11 a.m., Monday, Oct. 10

 
WHERE: Executive Dining Room, Metropolitan Water District headquarters, 700 N. Alameda St., adjacent to historic Union Station, downtown Los Angeles
 

PARTICIPANTS:

Metropolitan board Chairman Randy Record, General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger and Mark Cowin, director of the California Department of Water Resources
 
VISUALS: Exhibit of the latest water-saving devices available for residential and commercial rebates will be on display. B-roll footage also will be available upon request.
 

BACKGROUND:

With October marking the beginning of the water year, Metropolitan continues to face supply challenges in both of its imported water sources in Northern California and the Colorado River in 2017. Metropolitan’s imported supplies provide about half the Southland’s water.
 
Although the region’s water-saving efforts and last winter’s rain and snow in Northern California helped improve local stored reserves, extreme drought persists in much of the region. Metropolitan remains in a Water Supply Alert calling for continued awareness and reinforced conservation throughout the district’s 5,200-square-mile service area.
 
Heading into 2017, State Water Project reservoir storage is below historical averages. SWP deliveries—accounting for about a third of the Southland’s annual supplies—also face continued reductions because of pumping restrictions to protect fish species. The Colorado River drought continues. After 16 drought years, storage in the system’s two huge reservoirs—Lake Mead and Lake Powell—is at less than 40 percent, increasing the risk of shortage conditions in coming years.

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.

Contacts

Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
Bob Muir, (213) 217-6930; (213) 324-5213, mobile
Rebecca Kimitch, (213) 217-6450; (202) 821-5253, mobile

Contacts

Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
Bob Muir, (213) 217-6930; (213) 324-5213, mobile
Rebecca Kimitch, (213) 217-6450; (202) 821-5253, mobile