Pacific & Western Bank of Canada Announces 45% Increase in Net Earnings for the Year Ended October 31, 2015

LONDON, Ontario--()--Pacific & Western Bank of Canada (TSX:PWB):

FOURTH QUARTER HIGHLIGHTS (1)
(compared to the same periods in the prior year unless otherwise noted)

  • Net income of Pacific & Western Bank of Canada “the Bank” for the current quarter increased to $2.8 million or $0.11 per common share (basic and diluted) from $1.7 million or $0.05 per common share (basic and diluted) for the previous quarter and from $2.5 million or $0.13 per common share (basic and diluted) for the same period a year ago. Earnings per share amounts are after the deduction for dividends on preferred shares. Net income for the current quarter includes an income tax recovery of $1.0 million related to previously unrecognized deferred income tax assets compared to $nil in the previous quarter and $1.2 million for the same period a year ago.
  • Net income of the Bank for the year ended October 31, 2015 increased 45% to $8.2 million or $0.33 per common share (basic and diluted) from $5.7 million or $0.29 per common share (basic and diluted) for the same period a year ago. Net income for the current year includes an income tax recovery of $1.7 million related to previously unrecognized deferred income tax assets compared to $1.2 million for the same period a year ago.
  • Net interest margin or spread for the current quarter was 2.23% compared to 2.24% for the previous quarter and increased from 2.16% for the same period a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, net interest margin increased to 2.21% from 1.96% a year ago.
  • Lending assets grew to $1.45 billion from $1.38 billion at the end of the previous quarter and from $1.22 billion a year ago. The growth in loans was a result of increases in loans and lease receivables sourced through the Bank’s bulk purchase program.
  • Credit quality remains exceptional with no gross impaired loans at October 31, 2015, or at July 31, 2015 or a year ago.
  • At October 31, 2015, the Bank’s Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) ratio was 10.32% compared to 10.68% at the end of the previous quarter and 11.25% a year ago. The Bank’s total capital ratio was 13.51% at October 31, 2015, compared to 14.01% at the end of the previous quarter and 13.69% last year.

(1) Certain highlights include non-GAAP measures. See definition under ‘Basis of Presentation’ in the attached Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

PRESIDENT’S COMMENTS

I am pleased to report that our Bank has completed another very successful year. Significant progress was made in all key areas. Assets increased by 12% over the previous year and NIM increased by 13%, resulting in net income increasing by more than 45% over the previous year.

Loans and leases acquired and warehoused through our Bulk Purchase Program increased more than 150% over the previous year, with the year-end balance reaching over $600 million. We purchase loans and leases from an increasing number of non-bank and fintech financiers who operate throughout Canada in a variety of industries, many of which are taking advantage of new technologies to reach their customers. Our program facilitates this type of financing and indirectly provides much needed financing for small businesses and greater choice for consumers across Canada. We have developed state of the art highly scalable systems that allow us to process large numbers of these small ticket transactions. Credit risk is reduced to acceptable levels by substantial cash deposits made by our partners to be available to offset potential credit losses. Our Bank is at the leading edge of this new method of financing and this business is rapidly becoming a major portion of the Bank’s total assets and revenue stream.

Our well established Commercial Real Estate financing business again made significant contributions to the Bank’s overall earnings. Total loans in this division increased modestly to $667 million. The Bank lends to well establish real estate developers with projects mainly located in Ontario, occasionally lending in other markets throughout Canada.

Asset quality again remained industry leading with the Bank again reporting no impaired loans. The Bank prides its self on maintaining stellar credit adjudication and processes that consistently deliver industry leading results.

Many years ago the Bank developed custom software to enable it to gather deposits without the need for traditional branches. Our Bank now has a substantial network of over 100 deposit gathering partners that includes many of the larger banks’ brokerage firms. This channel provides a steady reliable stream of low cost deposits. In addition, our Bank opened up a new channel for gathering deposits that involved developing a custom banking solution for niche markets that may have unique challenges in dealing with the traditional banks. This new channel for deposit gathering is not only diversifying the Bank’s deposit base, but is also serving to lower its cost of funds. The Bank’s overall cost of funds decreased by 7% to 1.98% over the previous year.

Total revenue for the quarter increased by 3% to $9.3 million over the previous quarter and total revenue for the year increased by 16% to $35.4 million over the previous year. Net interest margin (NIM) increased by 13% to 2.21% over the previous year. Net income for the year was $8.2 million versus the previous year’s $5.7 million. Earnings per common share increased by 14% from $0.29 cents to $0.33 cents over previous year.

We have designed a state of the art, highly scalable Bank that, through utilization of specialized software and well-experienced staff, is able to rapidly acquire loans, leases and deposits with minimal costs. By targeting niche markets that are not well served by the larger financial institutions, our Bank is able to earn excellent margins without accepting much risk. The financial market place is embracing innovative new ideas and your Bank is at the forefront of prudently applying new ideas and technology to provide Canadians with greater choice and more economical financing solutions.

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

(unaudited)   for the three months ended   for the year ended
    October 31   October 31 October 31   October 31
($CDN thousands except per share amounts )   2015     2014       2015     2014  
Results of operations
Net interest income $ 8,961 $ 7,609 $ 33,974 $ 27,874
Net interest margin* 2.23 % 2.16 % 2.21 % 1.96 %
Non-interest income 384 791 1,394 2,633
Total revenue 9,345 8,400 35,368 30,507
Provision for credit losses 319 400 1,545 919
Non-interest expenses 6,562 6,243 24,784 22,947
Restructuring charges - - - 434
Income before income taxes 2,464 1,757 9,039 6,207
Net income 2,770 2,476 8,218 5,676
Income per common share:
Basic $ 0.11 $ 0.13 $ 0.33 $ 0.29
    Diluted     $ 0.11   $ 0.13     $ 0.33   $ 0.29  
Return on average common equity* 6.11 % 7.14 % 4.50 % 4.17 %
Book value per common share* $ 7.47 $ 7.14 $ 7.47 $ 7.14
Gross impaired loans to total loans 0.00 % 0.00 % 0.00 % 0.00 %
  Provision for credit losses as a % of average loans   0.02 %   0.03 %     0.12 %   0.08 %
          as at
Balance Sheet Summary
Cash and securities $ 149,511 $ 193,940 $ 149,511 $ 193,940
Total loans 1,447,660 1,224,247 1,447,660 1,224,247
Average loans 1,411,949 1,202,813 1,335,954 1,191,590
Total assets 1,625,806 1,445,860 1,625,806 1,445,860
Average assets 1,594,454 1,400,474 1,535,833 1,425,234
Deposits 1,325,828 1,193,797 1,325,828 1,193,797
Subordinated notes payable 13,959 13,863 13,959 13,863
Shareholders' equity 174,622 152,519 174,622 152,519
Capital ratios
Risk-weghted assets $ 1,320,158 $ 1,156,832 $ 1,320,158 $ 1,156,832
Total regulatory capital 178,291 158,326 178,291 158,326
Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) ratio 10.32 % 11.25 % 10.32 % 11.25 %
Tier 1 capital ratio 12.54 % 12.43 % 12.54 % 12.43 %
  Total capital ratio     13.51 %   13.69 %     13.51 %   13.69 %
* This is a non-GAAP measure. See definition under 'Basis of Presentation' in the attached
Management's Discussion and Analysis.


MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL CONDITION

This management’s discussion and analysis (MD&A) of operations and financial condition for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015, dated December 1, 2015, should be read in conjunction with the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements for the period ended October 31, 2015, included herein which have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). This MD&A should also be read in conjunction with the Bank’s MD&A and the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2014, which are available on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. Except as discussed below, all other factors discussed and referred to in the MD&A for the year ended October 31, 2014, remain substantially unchanged.

Basis of Presentation

Non-GAAP and Additional GAAP Measures

Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin or Spread

Most banks analyze profitability by net interest income (as presented in the Consolidated Statements of Income) and net interest margin or spread. Net interest margin or spread is defined as net interest income as a percentage of average total assets. Net interest margin or spread does not have a standardized meaning prescribed by IFRS and, therefore, may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other financial institutions.

Basel III Common Equity Tier 1, Tier 1 and Total Capital Adequacy Ratios

Basel III Common Equity Tier 1, Tier 1 and total capital adequacy ratios are determined in accordance with guidelines issued by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada (OSFI).

Book Value Per Common Share

Book value per common share is defined as Shareholders’ Equity less amounts relating to preferred shares recorded in equity, divided by the number of common shares outstanding.

Return on Average Common Equity

Return on average common equity is defined as annualized net income less amounts relating to preferred share dividends, divided by common shareholders’ equity which is shareholders’ equity less amounts relating to preferred shares recorded in equity.

Overview

Pacific & Western Bank of Canada (the “Bank”), provides commercial lending services to selected niche markets and raises its deposits through a diversified deposit broker network across Canada and from chequing accounts of trustees in the Canadian bankruptcy industry. The Bank has operated as a Schedule I bank under the Bank Act (Canada) since August 1, 2002. Prior to that, the Bank operated as a provincially licensed trust company since 1979. The Bank’s shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the Bank is the principal subsidiary of PWC Capital Inc. (the “Corporation” or “PWC”) whose securities are also listed and trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Net income for the current quarter increased to $2.8 million or $0.11 per common share (basic and diluted) from $1.7 million or $0.05 per common share (basic and diluted) for the previous quarter and from $2.5 million or $0.13 per common share (basic and diluted) for the same period a year ago. Net income for the current quarter includes an income tax recovery of $1.0 million relating to previously unrecognized deferred income tax assets compared to $nil in the previous quarter and $1.2 million for the same period a year ago. Earnings per share amounts are after the deduction for dividends on preferred shares.

Net income for the year ended October 31, 2015 increased to $8.2 million or $0.33 per common share (basic and diluted) from $5.7 million or $0.29 per common share (basic and diluted) for the same period a year ago. Net income for the current year includes an income tax recovery of $1.7 million relating to previously unrecognized deferred income tax assets compared to $1.2 million for the same period a year ago. Net income for same period a year ago also included restructuring charges of $434,000 related to the early repayment of subordinated debt.

At October 31, 2015, total assets were $1.63 billion compared to $1.56 billion at the end of the previous quarter and $1.45 billion a year ago. Total loans at October 31, 2015 increased to $1.45 billion from $1.38 billion at the end of the previous quarter and from $1.22 billion a year ago with the increase due primarily to growth in commercial and consumer loans and leases sourced through the bulk purchase program. The Bank has maintained its strong underwriting standards and credit quality remains exceptional with no gross impaired loans at October 31, 2015, at July 31, 2015 and a year ago.

At October 31, 2015, the Bank continued to exceed the Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) capital requirement of 7.0% with a CET1 ratio of 10.32% compared to 10.68% at the end of the previous quarter and 11.25% a year ago. The decrease in the CET1 ratio from previous periods was due to the growth in lending assets. At October 31, 2015, the Bank’s Tier 1 capital ratio was 12.54% compared to 13.01% at the end of the previous quarter and 12.43% a year ago. At October 31, 2015, the Bank’s total capital ratio was 13.51% compared to 14.01% at the end of the previous quarter and 13.69% a year ago.

On February 26, 2015, the Bank issued 1,681,320 Non-Cumulative 6-Year Rate Reset Series 3 Non-Viability Contingent Capital (NVCC) Preferred Shares for net proceeds of $15.7 million. These preferred shares qualify as Additional Tier 1 Capital.

Total Revenue

Total revenue consists of net interest income and non-interest income. For the three months ended October 31, 2015, total revenue increased to $9.3 million from $9.1 million for the previous quarter and from $8.4 million for the same period a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, total revenue increased to $35.4 million from $30.5 million a year ago, an increase of 16%. Total revenue increased from previous periods as a result of an increase in net interest income in the current periods which was due to growth in loans and lease receivables sourced through the bulk purchase program. Total revenue for the twelve month period a year ago included gains of $1.2 million from the sale of loans. There were no loan sales in the current year.

Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin

Net interest income for the three months ended October 31, 2015 increased to $9.0 million from $8.7 million for the previous quarter and $7.6 million for the same period a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, net interest income increased to $34.0 million from $27.9 million a year ago. The increases in net interest income from previous periods were due to higher levels of interest income in the current period primarily as a result of growth in lending assets as well as a lower cost of funds. For the year ended October 31, 2015, the cost of funds decreased to 1.98% from 2.13% for the previous year.

Net interest margin for the three months ended October 31, 2015 was 2.23% compared to 2.24% for the previous quarter and 2.16% for the same period a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, net interest margin increased to 2.21% from 1.96% a year ago. Net interest margin increased from a year ago primarily as a result of a more optimal asset mix. Net interest margin has not been impacted significantly by reductions in the interest rate by the Bank of Canada over the past year.

Non-interest Income

Non-interest income for the three months ended October 31, 2015, totalled $384,000 compared to $368,000 for the previous quarter and $791,000 for the same period a year ago with the change from the same quarter last year due to a gain of $400,000 from the sale of a loan in that year. Non-interest income for the year ended October 31, 2015, was $1.4 million compared to $2.6 million for the same period a year ago with the change from a year ago due to gains of $1,207,000 from the sale of loans last year. Non-interest income in the current period consists primarily of fees from credit cards.

Non-Interest Expenses

Non-interest expenses totalled $6.6 million for the current quarter compared to $6.4 million for the previous quarter and $6.2 million for the same period a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, non-interest expenses, excluding restructuring charges, totalled $24.8 million compared to $22.9 million for the same period a year ago. Restructuring charges in the previous year totaling $434,000 related to the repayment in December 2013 of subordinated debt. Non-interest expenses were higher than a year ago due to increases in professional and consulting fees, employee compensation and costs relating to the issue of NVCC preferred shares.

Income Taxes

The Bank’s statutory federal and provincial income tax rate is approximately 27%, similar to that of the previous periods. The effective rate is impacted by certain items not being taxable or deductible for income tax purposes as well as a positive adjustment relating to the recognition of previously unrecognized loss carryforwards discussed below.

For the three months ended October 31, 2015, the provision (recovery) for income taxes was ($306,000) compared to ($719,000) for the same period a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, the provision for income taxes was $821,000 compared to $531,000 for the same period a year ago with the increase due to a higher level of earnings partially offset by income tax recoveries recorded on account of previously unrecognized deferred income tax assets.

At October 31, 2015, the Bank has a deferred income tax asset of $8.8 million compared to $8.3 million at the end of the previous quarter and $8.5 million a year ago with the changes as a result of the drawdown of loss carryforwards due to the positive operating results over the past year, offset by the recognition of previously unrecognized deferred income assets as discussed above. The deferred income tax asset is primarily a result of income tax losses totalling approximately $27.0 million from previous periods. The income tax loss carryforwards are not scheduled to begin expiring until 2027 if unutilized.

Comprehensive Income

Comprehensive income is comprised of net income for the period and other comprehensive income (loss) which consists of unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities. Comprehensive income for the three months ended October 31, 2015 was $2.8 million compared to $1.7 million for the previous quarter and $2.5 million a year ago. Comprehensive income for the year ended October 31, 2015 was $8.2 million compared to $5.7 million a year ago. Due to the current composition of the treasury portfolio, which consists primarily of liquid securities, unrealized gains or losses in the portfolio are not significant and as a result, comprehensive income does not differ significantly from net income.

Consolidated Balance Sheet

At October 31, 2015, total assets were $1.63 billion compared to $1.56 billion at the end of the previous quarter and $1.45 billion a year ago. This increase was due to growth in lending assets which grew to $1.45 billion from $1.38 billion at the end of the previous quarter and from $1.22 billion a year ago. Growth in lending assets was primarily a result of an increase in loans and lease receivables sourced through the bulk purchase program as discussed below.

Cash and Securities

Cash and cash equivalents consist of deposits with Canadian financial institutions and government treasury bills with less than ninety days to maturity from the date of acquisition. Securities in the treasury portfolio typically consist of Government of Canada and Canadian provincial and municipal bonds, term deposits and debt of other financial institutions. Amounts invested in each of these securities are determined based on liquidity needs, investment yield and capital management considerations. Cash and securities, which are held primarily for liquidity purposes, totalled $150 million or 9% of total assets compared to $157 million or 10% of total assets at the end of the previous quarter and $194 million or 13% of total assets a year ago. The decrease in cash and securities from a year ago was due primarily to a lower level of deposits maturing in the coming months requiring a lower level of cash and liquid securities. The current level of cash and securities as a percentage of total assets is expected to be maintained in the coming months.

At October 31, 2015, unrealized gains in the available-for-sale securities portfolio were $18,000 compared to unrealized gains of $35,000 at the end of the previous quarter and $26,000 a year ago. In addition, there was an unrealized loss of $47,000 at October 31, 2015 relating to a security that is classified as held-to-maturity, compared to an unrealized loss of $52,000 at the end of the previous quarter. This unrealized loss is due to factors other than changes in credit risk and management is of the opinion that no impairment charge is required. This security matures in June 2016.

The Basel III Committee on Banking Supervision (the Basel Committee) has issued a framework outlining new liquidity standards. The framework prescribes two new standards being the Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR) and the Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR) as minimum regulatory standards beginning in 2015 and 2018 respectively. The LCR establishes a common measure of liquidity risk and requires financial institutions to maintain sufficient liquid assets to cover a minimum of 30 days of cash flow in a stressed scenario. The NSFR describes a second common measure of liquidity establishing a minimum acceptable amount of stable funding based on the liquidity characteristics of an institution’s assets and activities over a one year time horizon. Although the Basel Committee has introduced a phase-in period for compliance with the LCR guidelines, banks in Canada were required to fully comply with the LCR in January 2015 with no phase-in. The Bank is in compliance with the new LCR requirements and is well positioned to comply with the new NSFR requirements.

Loans

At October 31, 2015, loans increased to $1.45 billion from $1.38 billion at the end of the previous quarter and from $1.22 billion a year ago. The increase from the previous quarter and from the previous year was due primarily to growth in commercial and consumer loans and lease receivables sourced through the bulk purchase program.

At October 31, 2015, the balances of individual loan categories compared to the end of the previous quarter and a year ago reflects a change in lending strategy where focus on government financings has been reduced due to market conditions, and has been replaced by commercial and consumer lending opportunities, particularly those sourced through the bulk purchase program. At October 31, 2015, there was a decrease from previous periods in residential multi-family mortgages which was due primarily to the timing of loan transactions.

Commercial and consumer loans and lease receivables sourced through the bulk purchase program continued to show strong growth during the past year, particularly consumer loans and lease receivables sourced from this program. Outstanding balances from this source increased to $620 million at October 31, 2015 from $564 million at the end of the previous quarter, a net increase of $56 million or 10%, and from $394 million last year, a net increase of $226 million, or 57%. The bulk purchase program, which consists of the purchase of individual loans and lease receivables, continues to be a key initiative and the primary driver for growth of the lending portfolio in the coming years. These loans and lease receivables normally attract a lower collective allowance due to the level of cash holdbacks that are retained.

Total new lending for the quarter was $338 million compared to $277 million for the previous quarter and $189 million a year ago. Loan repayments for the quarter totalled $268 million compared to $246 million for the previous quarter and $144 million a year ago. For the current year, new lending totalled $1.09 billion compared to $707 million a year ago and loan repayments totalled $859 million for the current year compared to $637 million last year. At October 31, 2015, loan commitments representing loans in the Bank’s pipeline totalled $243 million compared to $210 million at the end of the previous quarter and $195 million a year ago.

Residential mortgage exposures

In accordance with the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) Guideline B-20 – Residential Mortgage Underwriting Practices and Procedures, additional information is provided regarding the Bank’s residential mortgage exposure. For the purposes of the Guideline, a residential mortgage is defined as a loan to an individual that is secured by residential property (one to four unit dwellings) and includes home equity lines of credit (HELOC’s). This differs from the classification of residential mortgages used by the Bank which also includes multi-family mortgages.

Under OSFI’s definition, the Bank’s exposure to residential mortgages at October 31, 2015 totalled $761,000 compared to $816,000 at the end of the previous quarter and $1.1 million a year ago. The Bank did not have any HELOC’s outstanding at October 31, 2015, or at the end of the previous quarter or a year ago.

Credit Quality

The Bank maintains high credit quality and strong underwriting standards and as a result traditionally requires minimal provisions for credit losses. Gross impaired loans at October 31, 2015, were $nil, unchanged from the end of the previous quarter and a year ago. The provision for credit losses in the current quarter was $319,000 or 2 basis points of average loans compared to $297,000 or 2 basis points of average loans for the previous quarter and $400,000 or 3 basis points of average loans a year ago. For the year ended October 31, 2015, the provision for credit losses totalled $1.6 million or 12 basis points of average loans compared to $919,000 or 8 basis points of average loans for the same period a year ago. The provision for credit losses increased from a year ago due to an increase in the collective allowance as a result of the growth in loans. Loan write offs during the past two years relate solely to credit card receivables. However, the total provision for credit losses still remains below the Bank’s target of 17 basis points of average loans for the current year.

At October 31, 2015, the collective allowance totalled $3.2 million compared to $3.1 million at the end of previous quarter and $2.9 million a year ago. Included in the collective allowance at October 31, 2015 was $1.0 million relating to credit card receivables, compared to $1.0 million at the end of the previous quarter and $962,000 a year ago.

Based on results from ongoing stress testing of the loan portfolio under various scenarios and the secured nature of the existing loan portfolio, the Bank is of the view that any credit losses which exist but cannot be specifically identified at this time are adequately provided for. The Bank’s loan exposure to the province of Alberta and to the oil and gas industry is not significant. As well, the Bank has minimal exposure to the housing market in Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.

Other Assets

Other assets totalled $28.6 million at October 31, 2015, compared to $29.5 million at the end of the previous quarter and $27.7 million a year ago. Included in other assets is the deferred income tax asset of $8.8 million compared to $8.3 million at the end of the previous quarter and $8.5 million a year ago. Also included in other assets are capital assets and prepaid expenses of $18.2 million compared to $19.1 million at the end of the previous quarter and $17.5 million a year ago.

Deposits and Other Liabilities

Deposits are used as a primary source of financing growth in assets and are raised primarily through a well established and well diversified deposit broker network across Canada. Deposits at October 31, 2015, totalled $1.33 billion compared to $1.28 billion at the end of the previous quarter and $1.19 billion a year ago, and consist primarily of guaranteed investment certificates. The increase in deposits from the previous periods was due to the raising of deposits to fund the increase in lending assets.

Of the total amount of deposits outstanding, $17.0 million or approximately 1.3% of total deposits at the end of the current quarter were in the form of demand savings accounts compared to $17.7 million or 1.4% of total deposits at the end of the previous quarter and $19.3 million or approximately 1.6% of total deposits a year ago. In addition, the Bank has chequing accounts related to trustees in the Canadian bankruptcy industry as discussed below.

The Bank continues to grow and expand its deposit broker network across Canada. In addition, in order to further diversify its sources of deposits and reduce its cost of new deposits, the Bank identified another source, that being chequing accounts of trustees in the Canadian bankruptcy industry. The Bank has developed banking software to enable this market to efficiently administer its chequing accounts. These services are provided to trustees in the bankruptcy industry across Canada and at October 31, 2015, balances from this source totalled $110.6 million compared to $108.7 million at the end of the previous quarter and $83.8 million a year ago.

Other liabilities typically consist of accounts payable, accruals, holdbacks payable related to the bulk purchase program and securities sold under repurchase agreements. At October 31, 2015, other liabilities totalled $67.9 million compared to $57.6 million at the end of the previous quarter and $42.2 million a year ago with the increases due to increased holdbacks associated with loans and leases sourced through the bulk purchase program which have shown significant growth over the past year.

An additional source of financing growth in assets and a source of liquidity is the use of margin lines and securities sold under repurchase agreements. At October 31, 2015, there were no amounts outstanding from these sources compared to none outstanding at the end of the previous quarter and none outstanding a year ago.

Securitization Liabilities

Securitization liabilities relate to amounts payable to counterparties for cash received upon initiation of securitization transactions in previous years. At October 31, 2015, securitization liabilities totalled $43.5 million compared to $43.6 million at the end of the previous quarter and $43.5 million a year ago. There have been no securitization transactions in the past several years. The amounts payable to counterparties bear interest at rates ranging from 1.97% - 3.95% and mature between 2016 and 2020. Securitized insured mortgages and other assets are pledged as collateral for these liabilities.

Subordinated Notes Payable

Subordinated notes payable, net of issue costs, totalled $14.0 million at October 31, 2015 compared to $13.9 at the end of the previous quarter and $13.9 million a year ago. Excluding issue costs, subordinated notes payable consist of $14.5 million issued to an unrelated party. These subordinated notes, of which $4.5 million are currently callable and $10 million are callable beginning in 2016, bear interest at rates ranging from 8.00% to 11.00% and mature between 2019 and 2021.

Shareholders’ Equity

At October 31, 2015, shareholders’ equity was $174.6 million compared to $172.4 million at the end of the previous quarter and $152.5 million a year ago. The increase from a year ago was due to earnings and proceeds received from the issue of Series 3 Preferred Shares as discussed below.

Common shares outstanding at October 31, 2015 totalled 19,437,171, unchanged from the previous quarter and a year ago. Common share options totalled 40,000 at October 31, 2015, also unchanged from the previous quarter and a year ago.

On February 26, 2015, the Bank issued 1,681,320 Non-Cumulative 6-Year Rate Reset Series 3 Non-Viability Contingent Capital (NVCC) Preferred Shares for net proceeds of $15.7 million. For the initial 6-year period ending April 30, 2021, these Series 3 Preferred Shares yield 7% annually, payable quarterly as and when declared by the Board of Directors. These preferred shares qualify as Additional Tier 1 Capital. Issue costs of $1,538,000, net of income taxes of $415,000, were allocated directly to share capital. At October 31, 2015, there were 1,681,320 Series 3 preferred shares outstanding.

The Bank’s book value per common share at October 31, 2015 was $7.47 compared to $7.36 at the end of the previous quarter and $7.14 a year ago.

See Note 9 to the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements for additional information relating to share capital.

Updated Share Information

As at December 1, 2015, there were no changes since October 31, 2015 in the number of outstanding common shares, Series 1 and Series 3 Preferred Shares and common share options.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As at October 31, 2015, the Bank does not have any significant off-balance sheet arrangements other than loan commitments and letters of credit resulting from normal course business activities. See Note 13 to the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements for more information.

Related Party Transactions

During the three months and year ended October 31, 2015, the Bank incurred management and other fees totalling $150,000 (October 31, 2014 - $80,000) and $600,000 (October 31, 2014 - $980,000) respectively to PWC and a subsidiary of PWC.

The Bank’s and PWC’s Board of Directors and Senior Executive Officers represent key management personnel. See Note 14 to the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements for additional information on related party transactions and balances.

Risk Management

The risk management policies and procedures of the Bank are provided in its annual MD&A for the year ended October 31, 2014, and are found on pages 37 to 43 of the Bank’s 2014 Annual Report.

Capital Management and Capital Resources

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision has published rules supporting more stringent global standards on capital adequacy and liquidity (Basel III). Significant changes under Basel III that are most relevant to the Bank include:

  • Increased focus on tangible common equity.
  • All forms of non-common equity such as the Bank’s conventional subordinated notes must be non-viability contingent capital (NVCC) compliant. NVCC compliant means the subordinated notes must include a clause that would require conversion to common equity in the event that OSFI deems the institution to be insolvent or a government is ready to inject a “bail out” payment.
  • Changes in the risk-weighting of certain assets.
  • Additional capital buffers.
  • New requirements for levels of liquidity and new liquidity measurements.

OSFI requires that all Canadian banks must comply with the Basel III standards on an “all-in” basis for purposes of determining its risk-based capital ratios. Required minimum regulatory capital ratios are a 7.0% Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) capital ratio and effective January 1, 2014, an 8.5% Tier 1 capital ratio and 10.5% total capital ratio, all of which include a 2.5% capital conservation buffer. The Basel III rules provide for “transitional” adjustments whereby certain aspects of the new rules will be phased in between 2013 and 2019. The only available transition allowed by OSFI for capital ratios is related to the 10 year phase out of non-qualifying capital instruments.

Under the Basel III standards, total regulatory capital was $178.3 million at October 31, 2015 compared to $176.6 million at the end of the previous quarter and $158.3 million a year ago. The increase in total regulatory capital from the previous periods was due primarily to earnings during the periods and the issue of Series 3 Preferred Shares in the second quarter of 2015.

At October 31, 2015, the Bank exceeded the current regulatory capital requirements with a CET1 ratio of 10.32% compared to 10.68% at the end of the previous quarter and 11.25% a year ago. The decrease in the CET1 ratio from previous periods was due primarily to an increase in risk-weighted assets resulting from the growth in lending assets. At October 31, 2015, the Tier 1 capital ratio was 12.54% compared to 13.01% at the end of the previous quarter and 12.43% a year ago. In addition, the total capital ratio was 13.51% at October 31, 2015, compared to 14.01% at the end of the previous quarter and 13.69% a year ago. At October 31, 2015, the leverage ratio was 9.53% compared to 9.84% at the end of the previous quarter. On January 1, 2015, the previous Assets–to-Capital Ratio was replaced by the Leverage Ratio which is prescribed under the Basel III Accord.

See Note 15 to the interim consolidated financial statements for more information regarding capital management.

Interest Rate Risk Management

The Bank is subject to interest rate risk which is the risk that a movement in interest rates could negatively impact net interest margin, net interest income and the economic value of assets, liabilities and shareholders’ equity. The following table provides the duration difference between the Bank’s assets and liabilities and the potential impact of a 100 basis point shift in interest rates on the Bank’s earnings during a 12 month period and the potential after-tax impact of a 100 basis point shift in interest rates on the Bank’s shareholders’ equity over a 60 month period if no remedial actions are taken.

      October 31, 2015     October 31, 2014
     

Increase 100
bps

 

Decrease 100
bps

Increase 100
bps

 

Decrease 100
bps

 
Impact on projected net interest
income during a 12 month period $ 3,371 $ (3,114) $ 3,543 $ (3,493)
Impact on reported equity
during a 60 month period $ 295 $ (86) $ (319) $ 484
               
Duration difference between assets and
liabilities (months)     0.8       0.2  


The Bank’s sensitivity to changes in interest rates and its duration difference between assets and liabilities at October 31, 2015 has not changed significantly since October 31, 2014. As indicated by the above, at October 31, 2015, the impact on net interest income during a 12 month period of a 100 basis point increase would be approximately $3.4 million and the impact on net interest income of a 100 basis point decrease would be approximately ($3.1 million). Similarly at October 31, 2015, the impact on equity during a 60 month period of a 100 basis point increase would be approximately $295,000 and the impact on equity of a 100 basis point decrease would be approximately ($86,000). As indicated by the above, the duration difference between assets and liabilities has not changed significantly from October 31, 2014 and shows that the Bank’s assets and liabilities would reprice at approximately the same time in the event of a change in interest rates.

Liquidity and Liquidity Management

The unaudited Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended October 31, 2015 shows cash provided by (used in) operations of ($57.4 million) compared to ($29.0 million) for the same period last year. The operating cash flow is primarily affected by the change in the balance of its deposits (a positive change in deposits has a positive impact on cash flow and a negative change in deposits has a negative impact on cash flow) as compared to the change in the balance of its loans (a positive change in loans has a negative impact on cash flow and a negative change in loans has a positive impact on cash flow). Based on factors such as liquidity requirements and opportunities for investment in loans and securities, the Bank may manage the amount of deposits it receives and loans it funds in ways that result in the balances of these items giving rise to either negative or positive cash flow from operations. The Bank will continue to fund its operations and meet contractual obligations as they become due from cash on hand and from managing the amount of deposits it receives as compared to the amount of loans it funds.

The Bank has established policies to ensure that its cash outflows and inflows are closely matched and that its sources of deposits are diversified between funding sources and over a wide geographic area. The Bank maintains a conservative investment profile by ensuring:

  • all Bank investments are high quality and include government debt securities, bankers acceptances and Canadian bank debt;
  • specific investment criteria and procedures are in place to manage the securities portfolio;
  • regular review, monitoring and approval of the investment policies by the Risk Oversight Committee of the Board of Directors; and
  • quarterly reporting to the Risk Oversight Committee on the composition of the securities portfolio.

Liquidity management is further supported by processes, which include but are not limited to:

  • monitoring of liquidity levels;
  • monitoring of liquidity trends and key risk indicators;
  • scenario stress testing;
  • monitoring the credit profile of the liquidity portfolio; and
  • monitoring deposit concentration.

In order to manage its liquidity needs, the Bank has a liquidity risk management program that is comprised specifically of the following policies and procedures:

  • Holding sufficient liquid assets which results in positive cumulative cash flow for a period of 31 to 60 days.
  • Holding of high quality liquid securities at levels that represent no less than 6% of total assets. High quality liquid securities include Canadian federal, provincial and municipal debt, debt of federally regulated Canadian financial institutions, widely distributed debt instruments, all of which are to be rated investment grade, cash on deposit and banker’s acceptances.
  • Maintaining liquid assets at no less than 65% of obligations payable within 90 days.
  • On a weekly basis, monitoring its cash flow requirements using a liquidity forecasting template under a highly stressed scenario.
  • On a monthly basis, testing liquidity using three specific disruption scenarios; specifically, industry specific disruption scenario, company specific liquidity disruption scenario and a systematic disruption scenario.
  • Managing liquidity in accordance with guidelines specified by OSFI.

Contractual Obligations

Contractual obligations as disclosed in its MD&A and audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended October 31, 2014, have not changed significantly as at October 31, 2015.

Capital Assets

The operations are not dependent upon significant amounts of capital assets to generate revenue. Currently, the Bank does not have any commitments for capital expenditures or for significant additions to its level of capital assets.

Summary of Quarterly Results

                                   
($CDN thousands except per share amounts) 2015   2014
Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1
 
Results of operations:
Total interest income $ 16,685 $ 16,513 $ 15,630 $ 15,629 $ 15,078 $ 14,156 $ 13,978 $ 14,949
Yield on assets (%) 4.15% 4.24% 4.21% 4.18% 4.27% 4.10% 4.06% 4.21%
Interest expense 7,724 7,786 7,375 7,598 7,469 7,469 7,335 8,014
Cost of funds (%) 1.92% 2.00% 1.99% 2.03% 2.11% 2.16% 2.13% 2.26%
Net interest income 8,961 8,727 8,255 8,031 7,609 6,687 6,643 6,935
Net interest margin (%) 2.23% 2.24% 2.22% 2.15% 2.16% 1.94% 1.93% 1.95%
Non-interest income 384 368 304 338 791 619 886 337
Total revenue 9,345 9,095 8,559 8,369 8,400 7,306 7,529 7,272
Provision for (recovery of) credit losses 319 297 427 502 400 303 267 (51)
Non-interest expenses 6,562 6,421 6,264 5,537 6,243 5,588 5,582 5,534
Restructuring charges - - - - - - - 434
Income (loss) before income taxes 2,464 2,377 1,868 2,330 1,757 1,415 1,680 1,355
Income tax provision (recovery) (306) 670 (194) 651 (719) 398 472 380
Net income (loss) $ 2,770 $ 1,707 $ 2,062 $ 1,679 $ 2,476 $ 1,017 $ 1,208 $ 975
 
Income (loss) per common share
Basic $ 0.11 $ 0.05 $ 0.09 $ 0.07 $ 0.13 $ 0.05 $ 0.06 $ 0.05
Diluted   $ 0.11 $ 0.05 $ 0.09 $ 0.07   $ 0.13 $ 0.05 $ 0.06 $ 0.05


The financial results for each of the last eight quarters are summarized above. The results, particularly total interest income and net interest income, are comparable between quarters and over the past eight quarters reflect some seasonality occurring, primarily in residential construction lending. Total interest income increased in 2015 as a result of growth in lending assets, specifically loan and leases sourced through the bulk purchase program. The Bank’s cost of funds decreased over the past eight quarters as a result of reductions in the Bank of Canada interest rate as well as the Bank being able to source lower cost deposits and hold lower amounts of cash and securities which reduces the amount of deposits being raised and its related cost.

Non-interest income during the quarters show variability due to the level of gains realized on the sale of loans in 2014. The other component of non-interest income consists primarily of credit card fees which have been comparable over the quarters.

Non-interest expenses increased since the first quarter of 2015 primarily due to increases in professional and consulting fees, employee compensation and costs relating to the issue of NVCC Preferred Shares. Restructuring charges in the first quarter of 2014 resulted from the write-off of unamortized issue costs related to the repayment of subordinated notes.

The provision for income taxes in each of the quarters reflects the effective statutory income tax rate applied to earnings. The provision for income taxes in the fourth and second quarters of 2015 and the fourth quarter of 2014 includes positive income tax adjustments of $1.0 million, $724,000 and $1.2 million respectively relating to a change in the estimate of previously unrecognized deferred income tax assets.

Significant Accounting Policies and Use of Estimates and Judgments

Significant accounting policies are detailed in Note 3 of the Bank’s 2014 Audited Consolidated Financial Statements. There have been no material changes in accounting policies since October 31, 2014.

In preparing the consolidated financial statements, management has exercised judgment and developed estimates in applying accounting policies and generating reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and income and expenses during the reporting periods. Areas where significant judgment was applied were in the assessments of impairment of financial instruments. Estimates were developed in the calculation of the allowance for credit losses and the measurement of deferred income taxes.

It is reasonably possible, on the basis of existing knowledge, that actual results may vary from that expected in the generation of these estimates. This could result in material adjustments to the carrying amounts of assets and/or liabilities affected in the future.

Estimates and their underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are applied prospectively once they are recognized.

The policies discussed below are considered particularly significant as they require management to make estimates or judgments, some of which may relate to matters that are inherently uncertain.

Financial Instruments

All financial assets are classified as one of the following: held-to-maturity, loans and receivables, or available-for-sale. All financial liabilities are classified as other liabilities. Financial assets held-to-maturity, loans and receivables and financial liabilities are measured at amortized cost based on the effective interest method. Available-for-sale instruments are measured at fair value with gains and losses, net of tax, recognized in other comprehensive income.

Securities

The Bank holds securities primarily for liquidity purposes with the intention of holding the securities to maturity or until market conditions render alternative investments more attractive. Settlement date accounting is used for all securities transactions.

At the end of each reporting period, the Bank assesses whether or not there is any objective evidence to suggest that a security may be impaired. Objective evidence of impairment results from one or more events that occur after the initial recognition of the security which has an impact that can be reliably estimated on the estimated future cash flows of the security such as financial difficulty of the issuer. An impairment loss is recognized for an equity instrument if the decline in fair value is significant or prolonged, as such circumstances provide objective evidence of impairment.

Impairment losses on a held-to-maturity security are recognized in income and loss in the period they are identified. When there is objective evidence of impairment of an available-for-sale security, the cumulative loss that has been recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income is reclassified to income or loss. For available-for-sale debt securities, if in a subsequent period the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was first recognized, then the previously recognized impairment loss is adjusted through income or loss to reflect the net recoverable amount of the impaired security. No adjustments of impairment losses are recognized for available-for-sale equity securities.

Loans

Loans are initially measured at fair value plus incremental direct transaction costs. Loans are subsequently measured at amortized cost, net of allowance for credit losses, using the effective interest method. On a monthly basis, the Bank assesses whether or not there is any objective evidence to suggest that the carrying value of the loans may be impaired. Impairment assessments are facilitated through the identification of loss events and assessments of their impact on the estimated future cash flows of the loans.

A loan is classified as impaired when, in management's opinion, there has been deterioration in credit quality to the extent that there is no longer reasonable assurance as to the timely collection of the full amount of principal and interest. Loans, except credit cards, where interest or principal is contractually past due 90 days are automatically recognized as impaired, unless management determines that the loan is fully secured, in the process of collection and the collection efforts are reasonably expected to result in either repayment of the loan or restoring it to current status. All loans, except credit cards, are classified as impaired when interest or principal is past due 180 days, except for loans guaranteed or insured by the Canadian government, provinces, territories, or a Canadian government agency, which are classified as impaired when interest or principal is contractually 365 days in arrears. Credit card receivables are written off when payments are 180 days past due, or upon receipt of a bankruptcy notification.

As loans are classified as loans and receivables and measured at amortized cost, an impairment loss is measured as the difference between the carrying amount and the present value of future cash flows discounted using the effective interest rate computed at initial recognition, if future cash flows can be reasonably estimated. When the amounts and timing of cash flows cannot be reasonably estimated, the carrying amount of the loan is reduced to its estimated net realizable value based on either:

(i) the fair value of any security underlying the loan, net of expected costs of realization, or,

(ii) observable market prices for the loan.

Impairment losses are recognized in income or loss. If, in a subsequent period, the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was first recognized, then a recovery of a portion or all of the previously recognized impairment loss is adjusted through income or loss to reflect the net recoverable amount of the impaired loan.

Real estate held for resale is recorded at the lower of cost and fair value, less costs to sell.

Allowance for Credit Losses

The Bank maintains an allowance for credit losses which, in management’s opinion, is adequate to absorb all credit related losses in its loan portfolio. The allowance for credit losses consists of both individual and collective allowances and is reviewed on a monthly basis. The allowance is included in loans on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

The Bank considers evidence of impairment for loans at both an individual asset and collective level. All individually significant loans are assessed for impairment first. All individually significant loans found not to be specifically impaired and all loans which are not individually significant are then collectively assessed for impairment.

The collective allowance is determined by separating loans into categories that are considered to have common risk elements and reviewing factors such as current portfolio credit quality trends, exposure at default, probability of default and loss given default rates and business and economic conditions. The collective allowance may also be adjusted by management using its judgment taking into account other observable and unobservable factors.

Corporate Income Taxes

Current income taxes are calculated based on taxable income at the reporting period end. Taxable income differs from accounting income because of differences in the inclusion and deductibility of certain components of income which are established by Canadian taxation authorities. Current income taxes are measured at the amount expected to be recovered or paid using statutory tax rates at the reporting period end.

The Bank follows the asset and liability method of accounting for deferred income taxes. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities arise from temporary differences between financial statement carrying values and the respective tax base of those assets and liabilities. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted or substantively enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years when temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled.

Deferred income tax assets are recognized in the consolidated financial statements to the extent that it is probable that the Bank will have sufficient taxable income to enable the benefit of the deferred income tax asset to be realized. Unrecognized deferred income tax assets are reassessed for recoverability at each reporting period end.

The realization of the deferred income tax asset is dependent upon the Bank being able to generate taxable income during the carry-forward period sufficient to offset the income tax losses and deductible temporary timing differences. While management is of the opinion that it is probable that the Bank will be able to realize the deferred income tax asset, there is no guarantee the Bank will be able to generate sufficient taxable income during the carry-forward period. The realization of the deferred income tax asset is dependent upon the Bank being able to generate taxable income in future years sufficient to offset the income tax losses.

Future Change in Accounting Policies

Financial instruments (IFRS 9)

In July, 2014, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) issued the final revised IFRS 9 standard which addresses classification, measurement and impairment of financial instruments and hedge accounting. IFRS 9 specifies that financial assets be classified into one of three categories: financial assets measured at amortized cost, financial assets measured at fair value through profit or loss or financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income. The standard also includes an expected credit loss model and a general hedging model.

IFRS 9 will be mandatorily effective for the Bank’s fiscal year beginning on November 1, 2018, although early adoption is permitted. In January 2015, OSFI determined that Domestic Systematically Important Banks (D-SIBs) should adopt IFRS 9 for their annual periods beginning November 1, 2017, while early adoption is permitted but not required for other federally regulated Canadian banks with October year ends such as the Bank. The Bank is of the view that at this time, it will not early adopt IFRS 9.

Controls and Procedures

During the most recent interim period, there have been no changes in the Bank’s policies and procedures and other processes that comprise its internal control over financial reporting, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Bank’s internal control over financial reporting.

At October 31, 2015, an evaluation was carried out by management of the effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and financial statement compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards. Based on that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer will file a certificate that the design and operating effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting were effective. These evaluations were conducted in accordance with the standards of the 2013 Internal Control - Integrated Framework of the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), a recognized control model, and the requirements of National Instrument 52-109 Certification of Disclosure in Issuers’ Annual and Interim Filings of the Canadian Securities Administrators.

Forward-Looking Statements

The statements in this management’s discussion and analysis that relate to the future are forward-looking statements. By their very nature, forward-looking statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties, both general and specific, many of which are out of our control. Risks exist that predictions, forecasts, projections and other forward-looking statements will not be achieved. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements as a number of important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from the plans, objectives, expectations, estimates and intentions expressed in such forward-looking statements. These factors include, but are not limited to, the strength of the Canadian economy in general and the strength of the local economies within Canada in which we conduct operations; the effects of changes in monetary and fiscal policy, including changes in interest rate policies of the Bank of Canada; commodity prices; the effects of competition in the markets in which we operate; inflation; capital market fluctuations; the timely development and introduction of new products in receptive markets; the impact of changes in the laws and regulations regulating financial services; changes in tax laws; technological changes; unexpected judicial or regulatory proceedings; unexpected changes in consumer spending and savings habits; and our anticipation of and success in managing the risks implicated by the foregoing. For a detailed discussion of certain key factors that may affect future results, please see pages 44 to 45 of our 2014 Annual Report.

The foregoing list of important factors is not exhaustive. When relying on forward-looking statements to make decisions, investors and others should carefully consider the foregoing factors and other uncertainties and potential events. The forward-looking information contained in the management’s discussion and analysis is presented to assist our shareholders in understanding our financial position and may not be appropriate for any other purposes. Except as required by securities law, we do not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that is contained in this management’s discussion and analysis or made from time to time by the Bank or on its behalf.

PACIFIC & WESTERN BANK OF CANADA
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)

(thousands of Canadian dollars)              
  October 31 October 31
As at             2015   2014
 
Assets
 
Cash and cash equivalents $ 127,078 $ 145,140
Securities (note 4) 22,433 48,800
Loans, net of allowance for credit losses (note 5) 1,447,660 1,224,247
Other assets 28,635 27,673
               
            $ 1,625,806 $ 1,445,860
 
Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity
 
Deposits $ 1,325,828 $ 1,193,797
Subordinated notes payable (note 6) 13,959 13,863
Securitization liabilities (note 7) 43,525 43,466
Other liabilities (note 8)         67,872   42,215
1,451,184 1,293,341
 
Shareholders' equity:
Share capital (note 9) 171,706 155,993
Retained earnings (deficit) 2,903 (3,493)
Accumulated other comprehensive income   13   19
174,622 152,519
               
            $ 1,625,806 $ 1,445,860


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these interim Consolidated Financial Statements.

PACIFIC & WESTERN BANK OF CANADA
Consolidated Statements of Income
(Unaudited)

(thousands of Canadian dollars, except per share amounts)          
            for the three months ended   for the year ended
  October 31   October 31   October 31 October 31
              2015   2014     2015   2014
 
Interest income:
Loans $ 16,409 $ 14,517 $ 62,973 $ 55,278
Securities           276   561     1,484   2,883
16,685 15,078 64,457 58,161
 
Interest expense:
Deposits and other 7,372 7,120 29,091 28,767
Subordinated notes         352   349     1,392   1,520
7,724 7,469 30,483 30,287
                     
Net interest income 8,961 7,609 33,974 27,874
 
Non-interest income (note 10)       384   791     1,394   2,633
Total revenue 9,345 8,400 35,368 30,507
 
Provision for credit losses (note 5b)       319   400     1,545   919
9,026 8,000 33,823 29,588
 
Non-interest expenses:
Salaries and benefits 3,637 3,027 13,041 11,273
General and administrative 2,404 2,658 9,648 9,589
Premises and equipment       521   558     2,095   2,085
6,562 6,243 24,784 22,947
Restructuring charges (note 6)       -   -     -   434
6,562 6,243 24,784 23,381
                     
Income before income taxes 2,464 1,757 9,039 6,207
 
Income tax (recovery) provision (note 11) (306) (719) 821 531
                     
Net income         $ 2,770 $ 2,476   $ 8,218 $ 5,676
 
Basic income per common share (note 12) $ 0.11 $ 0.13 $ 0.33 $ 0.29
 
Diluted income per common share $ 0.11 $ 0.13 $ 0.33 $ 0.29
 
Weighted average number of
common shares outstanding 19,437,000 19,437,000 19,437,000 19,437,000


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these interim Consolidated Financial Statements.

PACIFIC & WESTERN BANK OF CANADA
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)

(thousands of Canadian dollars)                                    
          for the three months ended   for the year ended
  October 31 October 31   October 31 October 31
          2015 2014   2015 2014
 
Net income $ 2,770 $ 2,476 $ 8,218 $ 5,676
 
Other comprehensive income, net of tax

Net unrealized losses on assets
held as available-for-sale (1)

 

(12) - (6) (5)
                   
Comprehensive income     $ 2,758 $ 2,476   $ 8,212 $ 5,671


(1) Net of income tax benefit for the three months of $5 (2014 – $nil) and for the year of $2 (2014 – $2)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these interim Consolidated Financial Statements.

PACIFIC & WESTERN BANK OF CANADA
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity
(Unaudited)

(thousands of Canadian dollars)                      
            for the three months ended for the year ended
    October 31   October 31 October 31   October 31
              2015   2014   2015   2014
 
Common shares (note 9):
                   
Balance, beginning and end of the period $ 142,224 $ 142,224 $ 142,224 $ 142,224
 
Preferred shares (note 9):
 
Series 1 preferred shares
Balance, beginning of the period $ 13,647 $ - $ 13,647 $ -
Issued during the period, net of issue costs and income taxes - 13,647 - 13,647
                   
Balance, beginning and end of the period $ 13,647 $ 13,647 $ 13,647 $ 13,647
 
Series 3 preferred shares
Balance, beginning of the period $ 15,690 $ - $ - $ -
Issued during the period, net of issue costs and income taxes - - 15,690 -
                   
Balance, beginning and end of the period $ 15,690 $ - $ 15,690 $ -
 
Contributed surplus (note 9):
 
Balance, beginning of the period $ 141 $ 108 $ 122 $ 54
Fair value of stock options granted 4 14 23 68
                 
Balance, end of the period     $ 145 $ 122 $ 145 $ 122
                 
Total share capital       $ 171,706 $ 155,993 $ 171,706 $ 155,993
 
Retained earnings (deficit):
 
Balance, beginning of the period $ 683 $ (5,969) $ (3,493) $ (9,169)
Net income 2,770 2,476 8,218 5,676
Dividends paid on preferred shares (550) - (1,822) -
                 
Balance, end of the period     $ 2,903 $ (3,493) $ 2,903 $ (3,493)
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income, net of taxes:
 
Balance, beginning of the period $ 25 $ 19 $ 19 $ 24
Other comprehensive income (loss) (12) - (6) (5)
                 
Balance, end of the period     $ 13 $ 19 $ 13 $ 19
                 
Total shareholders' equity     $ 174,622 $ 152,519 $ 174,622 $ 152,519


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these interim Consolidated Financial Statements.

PACIFIC & WESTERN BANK OF CANADA
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)

(thousands of Canadian dollars)            
        October 31   October 31
For the year ended             2015     2014
 
Cash provided by (used in):
 
Operations:
Net income $ 8,218 $ 5,676
Adjustments to determine net cash flows:
Items not involving cash:
Provision for credit losses 1,545 919
Stock-based compensation 23 68
Income tax provision 821 531
Gain on sale of loans - (1,207)
Interest income (64,457) (58,161)
Interest expense 30,483 30,287
Restructuring charges - 434
Amortization of property and equipment 393 396
Interest received 63,297 56,949
Interest paid (29,909) (31,277)
Change in operating assets and liabilities:
Loans (223,565) (64,395)
Deposits 131,612 7,647
  Change in other assets and liabilities   24,102     23,112
(57,437) (29,021)
Investing:
Purchase of securities - (34,894)
Proceeds from sale and maturity of securities   25,922     26,443
25,922 (8,451)
Financing:
Repayment of subordinated notes - (7,000)
Proceeds from shares issued, net of costs 15,275 13,289
Dividends paid           (1,822)     -
13,453 6,289
                     
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents (18,062) (31,183)
 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of the period 145,140 176,323
                     
Cash and cash equivalents, end of the period $ 127,078   $ 145,140
 
Cash and cash equivalents is represented by:
Cash $ 39,091 $ 52,539
Cash equivalents 87,987 92,601
                     
Cash and cash equivalents, end of the period $ 127,078   $ 145,140


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these interim Consolidated Financial Statements. PACIFIC & WESTERN BANK OF CANADA

Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Three month period and year ended October 31, 2015 and 2014

1. Reporting entity:

Pacific & Western Bank of Canada (the “Bank”) operates as a Schedule I bank under the Bank Act (Canada) and is regulated by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI). The Bank, whose shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange, is involved in the business of providing commercial lending services to selected niche markets.

The Bank is incorporated and domiciled in Canada, and maintains its registered office at Suite 2002, 140 Fullarton Street, London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5P2. It is the principal subsidiary of PWC Capital Inc. (“PWC”) whose shares also trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange. At October 31, 2015 PWC owned approximately 68% of the common shares of the Bank.

2. Basis of preparation:

a) Statement of compliance:

These interim Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard (IAS) 34 – Interim Financial Reporting and do not include all of the information required for full annual financial statements. These interim Consolidated Financial Statements should be read in conjunction with the Bank’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended October 31, 2014.

The interim Consolidated Financial Statements for the three months and year ended October 31, 2015, and 2014 were approved by the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors on December 1, 2015.

b) Basis of measurement:

These interim Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except for securities designated as available-for-sale that are measured at fair value in the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

c) Functional and presentation currency:

These interim Consolidated Financial Statements are presented in Canadian dollars which is the Bank’s functional currency. Except as indicated, the financial information presented has been rounded to the nearest thousand.

d) Use of estimates and judgments:

In preparing these interim Consolidated Financial Statements, management has exercised judgment and developed estimates in applying accounting policies and generating reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and income and expenses during the reporting period. Areas where significant judgment was applied were in the assessments of impairment of financial instruments. Estimates were developed in the calculation of the allowance for credit losses and the measurement of deferred income taxes.

It is reasonably possible, on the basis of existing knowledge, that actual results may vary from that expected in the generation of these estimates. This could result in material adjustments to the carrying amounts of assets and/or liabilities affected in the future.

Estimates and their underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are applied prospectively once they are recognized.

3. Significant accounting policies:

The accounting policies applied by the Bank in these interim Consolidated Financial Statements are the same as those applied by the Bank as at and for the year ended October 31, 2014 and are detailed in Note 3 of the Bank’s 2014 Audited Consolidated Financial Statements. There have been no material changes in accounting policies.

4. Securities:

Portfolio analysis:

  October 31   October 31
      2015   2014
 
Available-for-sale securities
Securities issued or guaranteed by:
Canadian provincial governments $ 9,607 $ 9,581
Canadian municipal governments 279 554
Term deposits     -   26,055
Total available-for-sale securities   $ 9,886 $ 36,190
 
Held-to-maturity security
Debt of other financial institutions   $ 12,547 $ 12,610
Total securities   $ 22,433 $ 48,800


Canadian provincial government securities are carried at fair value based on quoted market prices (Level 1) and term deposits and Canadian municipal debt fall into Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. See Note 3 (c) of the October 31, 2014 consolidated financial statements for more information.

5. Loans:

a) Portfolio analysis:

  October 31   October 31
      2015   2014
 
 
Government financing $ 72,181 $ 87,332
Residential multi-family mortgages 112,759 122,686
Commercial and consumer loans and leases 783,780 548,240
Commercial mortgages 445,941 432,567
Credit card receivables 27,447 27,972
Other loans     3,721   3,967
1,445,829 1,222,764
 
Collective allowance (3,212) (2,905)
Accrued interest 5,043 4,388
       
Total loans, net of allowance for credit losses   $ 1,447,660 $ 1,224,247


The collective allowance for credit losses relates to the following loan portfolios:

  October 31   October 31
      2015   2014
 
Government financing $ 18 $ 13
Residential multi-family mortgages 30 66
Commercial and consumer loans and leases 624 446
Commercial mortgages 1,475 1,393
Credit card receivables 1,044 962
Other loans     21   25
    $ 3,212 $ 2,905


The Bank holds security against the majority of its loans in the form of either mortgage interests over property, other registered securities over assets, guarantees and holdbacks on commercial and consumer loans and leases (note 8).

b) Allowance for credit losses:

The allowance for credit losses results from the following:

      October 31   October 31
2015 2014
For the three months ended   Collective Individual Total Allowance Total Allowance
 
Balance, beginning of the period $ 3,118 $ - $ 3,118 $ 2,807
Provision for credit losses 319 - 319 400
Write-offs (225) - (225) (302)
             
Balance, end of the period   $ 3,212 $ - $ 3,212 $ 2,905
 
             
October 31 October 31
2015 2014
For the years ended     Collective Individual Total Allowance Total Allowance
 
Balance, beginning of the period $ 2,905 $ - $ 2,905 $ 3,275
Provision for credit losses 1,545 - 1,545 919
Write-offs (1,238) - (1,238) (1,289)
             
Balance, end of the period   $ 3,212 $ - $ 3,212 $ 2,905


c) Impaired loans:

At October 31, 2015, there were no impaired loans (October 31, 2014 - $nil). At October 31, 2015, loans, other than credit card receivables, past due totalled $nil (October 31, 2014 - $nil). At October 31, 2015, credit card receivables overdue by one day or more totalled $2,773,000 (October 31, 2014 - $2,999,000).

6. Subordinated notes payable:

          October 31   October 31
              2015   2014
 

Ten year term, unsecured, callable, subordinated notes
payable by the Bank to an unrelated party, maturing
between 2019 and 2021, net of issue costs of $541
(October 31, 2014 - $637) effective interest of 10.06%

$ 13,959 $ 13,863
               
            $ 13,959 $ 13,863


During the year ended October 31, 2014, the Bank repaid $7,000,000 in subordinated notes which had a carrying value of $6,566,000. The difference of $434,000 relating to unamortized note issue costs was included in restructuring charges in the Consolidated Statements of Income.

7. Securitization liabilities:

Securitization liabilities include amounts payable to counterparties for cash received upon initiation of securitization transactions, accrued interest on amounts payable to counterparties, and the unamortized balance of deferred costs and discounts which arose upon initiation of the securitization transactions.

The amounts payable to counterparties bear interest at rates ranging from 1.97% - 3.95% and mature between 2016 and 2020. Securitized insured mortgages and other assets are pledged as collateral for these liabilities.

8. Other liabilities:

  October 31   October 31
      2015   2014
 
Accounts payable and other $ 6,869 $ 5,379
Holdbacks payable on commercial and consumer loans and leases 61,003 36,836
       
    $ 67,872 $ 42,215


9. Share capital:

a) Common shares and contributed surplus:

At October 31, 2015, there were 19,437,171 (October 31, 2014 – 19,437,171) common shares outstanding.

During the three months and year ended October 31, 2015, the Bank recognized compensation expense of $4,000 (October 31, 2014 - $14,000) and $23,000 (October 31, 2014 - $68,000) respectively, relating to the estimated fair value of stock options granted in prior periods. No stock options were granted during the current periods.

b) Preferred shares:

On February 26, 2015, the Bank issued 1,681,320 Series 3 Preferred Shares for net proceeds of $15,690,000. These shares are Basel III compliant, non-cumulative six year rate reset preferred shares which includes non-viability contingent capital provisions. As a result, these shares qualify as Additional Tier 1 Capital (see note 15). Issue costs of $1,538,000, net of income taxes of $415,000, were allocated directly to share capital. At October 31, 2015, there were 1,681,320 (October 31, 2014 – nil) Series 3 preferred shares outstanding.

On October 30, 2014 the Bank issued 1,461,460 Series 1 preferred shares for net proceeds of $13,647,000. These shares are Basel III compliant, non-cumulative five year rate reset preferred shares which includes non-viability contingent capital provisions. As a result, these shares qualify as Additional Tier 1 Capital. Issue costs of $1,325,000, net of income taxes of $358,000, were allocated directly to share capital. At October 31, 2015, there were 1,461,460 (October 31, 2014 – 1,461,460) Series 1 preferred shares outstanding.

10. Non-interest income:

                 
    for the three months ended for the year ended
  October 31   October 31 October 31   October 31
      2015   2014   2015   2014
 
Credit card non-interest revenue $ 330 $ 378 $ 1,308 $ 1,369
Other income 54 13 86 57
Gain on sale of loans - 400 - 1,207
           
    $ 384 $ 791 $ 1,394 $ 2,633


11. Income taxes:

                       
        for the three months ended for the year ended
    October 31 October 31 October 31 October 31
          2015   2014   2015   2014
 
Income tax on earnings $ 694 $ 491 $ 2,545 $ 1,741
Recognition of previously unrecognized deferred income tax asset (1,000) (1,210) (1,724) (1,210)
               
        $ (306) $ (719) $ 821 $ 531


12. Income per share:

                     
        for the three months ended for the year ended
  October 31 October 31 October 31 October 31
          2015   2014   2015   2014
 
Net income $ 2,770 $ 2,476 $ 8,218 $ 5,676
Less: dividends on preferred shares   (550)   -   (1,822)   -
2,220 2,476 6,396 5,676
 
Average number of common shares outstanding 19,437,000 19,437,000 19,437,000 19,437,000
               
Income per share:       $ 0.11 $ 0.13 $ 0.33 $ 0.29


Employee stock options do not have a dilutive impact as the exercise price is greater than the average market price. The Series 1 and Series 3 NVCC preferred shares are contingently issuable shares and do not have a dilutive impact.

13. Commitments and contingencies:

The amount of credit related commitments represents the maximum amount of additional credit that the Bank could be obligated to extend. Under certain circumstances, the Bank may cancel loan commitments at its option. The amounts with respect to the letters of credit are not necessarily indicative of credit risk as many of these arrangements are contracted for a limited period of usually less than one year and will expire or terminate without being drawn upon.

  October 31   October 31
      2015   2014
 
Loan commitments $ 243,252 $ 195,148
Undrawn credit card lines 140,071 159,306
Letters of credit 39,015 43,926
       
    $ 422,338 $ 398,380


14. Related party transactions:

During the three months and year ended October 31, 2015, the Bank incurred management and other fees totalling $150,000 (October 31, 2014 - $80,000) and $600,000 (October 31, 2014 - $980,000) respectively to PWC and a subsidiary of PWC.

The Bank’s and PWC’s Boards of Directors and Senior Executive Officers represent key management personnel.

The Bank has loans to employees and key management personnel. At October 31, 2015, amounts due from key management personnel totalled $2,303,000 (October 31, 2014 - $2,298,000) and are unsecured. The interest rates charged on these loans are similar to those charged in an arms-length transaction. Interest income earned on the above loans for the three months and year ended October 31, 2015 was $18,000 (October 31, 2014 - $21,000) and $73,000 (October 31, 2014 - $81,000) respectively. There were no provisions for credit losses related to loans issued to key management personnel for the three months and years ended October 31, 2015 and 2014.

15. Capital management:

a) Overview:

The Bank’s policy is to maintain a strong capital base so as to maintain investor, creditor and market confidence and to sustain future development of the business. The impact of the level of capital on shareholders’ return is also important and the Bank recognizes the need to maintain a balance between the higher returns that might be possible with greater leverage and the advantages and security afforded by a sound capital position.

OSFI sets and monitors capital requirements for the Bank. Capital is managed in accordance with policies and plans that are regularly reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors and take into account forecasted capital needs and conditions in financial markets.

The goal is to maintain adequate regulatory capital to be considered well capitalized, protect consumer deposits and provide capacity for internally generated growth and strategic opportunities that do not otherwise require accessing the public capital markets, all the while providing a satisfactory return to shareholders. The Bank’s regulatory capital is comprised of share capital, retained earnings (deficit) and unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities (Common Equity Tier 1 capital), preferred shares (Additional Tier 1 capital) and the qualifying amount of subordinated notes (Tier 2 capital).

The Bank monitors its capital adequacy and related capital ratios on a daily basis and has policies setting internal maximum and minimum amounts for its capital ratios. These capital ratios consist of the leverage ratio and the risk-based capital ratios.

During the period ended October 31, 2015, there were no material changes in the Bank’s management of capital.

b) Risk-Based Capital Ratios:

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision has published the Basel III rules supporting more stringent global standards on capital adequacy and liquidity (Basel III).

OSFI requires that all Canadian banks must comply with the Basel III standards on an “all-in” basis that became effective January 1, 2013 for purposes of determining its risk-based capital ratios. Required minimum regulatory capital ratios are a 7.0% Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) capital ratio and effective January 1, 2014, an 8.5% Tier 1 capital ratio and 10.5% total capital ratio, all of which include a 2.50% capital conservation buffer. The Basel III rules provide for “transitional” adjustments whereby certain aspects of the new rules will be phased in between 2013 and 2019. The only available transition allowed by OSFI for capital ratios is related to the 10 year phase out of non-qualifying capital instruments.

OSFI also requires banks to measure capital adequacy in accordance with guidelines for determining risk adjusted capital and risk-weighted assets including off-balance sheet credit instruments as specified in the Basel III regulations. Based on the deemed credit risk for each type of asset, assets held by the Bank are assigned a weighting of 0% to 150% to determine the risk-based capital ratios.

The Bank’s risk-based capital ratios are calculated as follows:

            October 31, 2015   October 31, 2014
          "All-in"   "Transitional" "All-in"   "Transitional"
 
Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) capital
Directly issued qualifying common share capital $ 142,369 $ 142,369 $ 142,346 $ 142,346
Retained earnings (deficit) 2,903 2,903 (3,493) (3,493)
  Accumulated other comprehensive income   13   13   19   19
CET1 capital before regulatory adjustments 145,285 145,285 138,872 138,872
  Total regulatory adjustments to CET1   (9,031)   (3,612)   (8,693)   (1,739)
Common Equity Tier 1 capital   $ 136,254 $ 141,673 $ 130,179 $ 137,133
 
Additional Tier 1 (AT1) capital
  Directly issued qualifying AT1 instruments $ 29,337 $ 29,337 $ 13,647 $ 13,647
Tier 1 capital     $ 165,591 $ 171,010 $ 143,826 $ 150,780
 
Tier 2 capital
Directly issued capital instruments subject to
  phase out from Tier 2   $ 12,700 $ 12,700 $ 14,500 $ 14,500
Tier 2 capital before regulatory adjustments 12,700 12,700 14,500 14,500
  Total regulatory adjustments to Tier 2 capital   -   -   -   -
Tier 2 capital       $ 12,700 $ 12,700 $ 14,500 $ 14,500
Total capital       $ 178,291 $ 183,710 $ 158,326 $ 165,280
Total risk-weighted assets   $ 1,320,158 $ 1,325,576 $ 1,156,832 $ 1,163,786
Capital ratios
CET1 Ratio 10.32% 10.69% 11.25% 11.78%
Tier 1 Capital Ratio 12.54% 12.90% 12.43% 12.96%
  Total Capital Ratio       13.51%   13.86%   13.69%   14.20%


c) Leverage Ratio:

On January 1, 2015, the assets-to-capital multiple was replaced by the leverage ratio that is prescribed under the Basel III Accord. The leverage ratio is a supplementary measure to the risk-based capital requirements and is defined as the ratio of Tier 1 capital to its total exposures. The Bank is in compliance with its leverage ratio that is calculated as follows:

  October 31
      2015
 
On-balance sheet assets $ 1,625,806
Asset amounts deducted in determining Basel III "all in" Tier 1 Capital   (9,031)
Total on-balance sheet exposures     1,616,775
 
Off-balance sheet exposure at gross notional amount $ 422,339
Adjustments for conversion to credit equivalent amount   (301,674)
Off-balance sheet exposures     120,665
 
Tier 1 Capital     165,591
Total Exposures 1,737,440
 
Basel III Leverage Ratio     9.53%


The Bank was in compliance with the leverage ratio prescribed by OSFI throughout the period presented.

16. Interest rate position:

The Bank is subject to interest rate risk which is the risk that a movement in interest rates could negatively impact net interest margin, net interest income and the economic value of assets, liabilities and shareholders’ equity. The following table provides the duration difference between the Bank’s assets and liabilities and the potential impact of a 100 basis point shift in interest rates on the Bank’s earnings during a 12 month period and the potential after-tax impact of a 100 basis point shift in interest rates on the Bank’s shareholders’ equity over a 60 month period if no remedial actions are taken.

        October 31, 2015     October 31, 2014
      Increase 100 bps   Decrease 100 bps Increase 100 bps   Decrease 100 bps
 
Impact on projected net interest
income during a 12 month period $ 3,371 $ (3,114) $ 3,543 $ (3,493)
Impact on reported equity
during a 60 month period $ 295 $ (86) $ (319) $ 484
               
Duration difference between assets and
liabilities (months)     0.8       0.2  


17. Fair Value of Financial Instruments:

Fair values are based on management’s best estimates of market conditions and valuation policies at a certain point in time. The estimates are subjective and involve particular assumptions and matters of judgment and as such, may not be reflective of future fair values. The Bank’s loans and deposits lack an available market as they are not typically exchanged. Therefore, they are not necessarily representative of amounts realizable upon immediate settlement. See Note 22 to the October 31, 2014 consolidated financial statements for more information on fair values.

                 
  October 31, 2015   October 31, 2014
Fair value   Fair value
Book of assets Book of assets
  Value and liabilities   Value and liabilities
 
Assets
 
Cash and cash equivalents $ 127,078 $ 127,078 $ 145,140 $ 145,140
Securities 22,433 22,386 48,800 48,671
Loans 1,447,660 1,449,567 1,224,247 1,224,730
Other financial assets 5,887 5,887 5,057 5,057
           
 
Liabilities
 
Deposits $ 1,325,828 $ 1,333,366 $ 1,193,797 $ 1,198,530
Subordinated notes payable 13,959 14,500 13,863 14,500
Securitization liabilities 43,525 47,604 43,466 46,732
Other financial liabilities 67,872 67,872 42,215 42,215


Pacific & Western Bank of Canada (PWBank), a Schedule I chartered bank, is a branchless financial institution with over $1.6 billion in assets. PWBank specializes in providing commercial lending services to selected niche markets and receives its deposits through a diversified deposit broker network across Canada.

Pacific & Western Bank of Canada shares trade on the TSX under the symbol PWB.

On behalf of the Board of Directors: David R. Taylor, President & C.E.O.

To receive company news releases, please contact:
Wade MacBain at wadem@pwbank.com (519) 675-4201

Visit our website at: http://www.pwbank.com

Contacts

Pacific & Western Bank of Canada
Investor Relations
Wade MacBain, 800-244-1509,
wadem@pwbank.com
or
Public Relations & Media
Tel Matrundola, 416-203-0882
Vice-President
telm@pwbank.com

Contacts

Pacific & Western Bank of Canada
Investor Relations
Wade MacBain, 800-244-1509,
wadem@pwbank.com
or
Public Relations & Media
Tel Matrundola, 416-203-0882
Vice-President
telm@pwbank.com