Physicians Say Patient Care Guided By Certified Diabetes Educator-Ambassadors Reaps Substantial Rewards

NASHVILLE, Tenn.--()--Certified diabetes educator “ambassadors” (CDE-A) –- professionals trained by endocrinologists and practicing in primary care settings -- can help patients with diabetes achieve significant patient improvements while easing the shortage of endocrine specialists available to treat the increasingly prevalent illness, says a medical team from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo.

The Buffalo SUNY group, composed of internal medicine specialists, endocrinologists, internal medicine and RN/CDEs, shared its findings today at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists24th Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress.

The team conducted a retrospective review of 100 type 2 diabetes patients whose care was being managed by a CDE-A in a primary care setting and compared medical test results of those receiving CDE-A intervention with those who were not. The CDE-As continued to consult with the endocrinologist trainer on an as-needed basis, and any changes suggested by the CDE-A to the patient’s diabetes regimen had to be authorized first by the PCP.

The differences between the two groups were substantial: in the CDE-A intervention group, during the study’s four-and-a-half month period, patients’ A1c levels, weight, BMI, blood pressure measurements, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels showed a marked improvement. In contrast, another group of patients with diabetes from the same practice who were not referred to a CDE-A showed no significant change in any of the measures.

“The improvements that occurred in ambassador-guided patients’ glycemia, blood pressure, lipids and body weight could potentially lead to significant reductions in macro- and microvascular complications as well as an improvement in the quality of life for these patients,” said Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, FRCP, FACP, Director of the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center of Western New York at the State University of New York at Buffalo. “Further, this treatment approach can help reduce the magnitude of expenditures which currently occurs in the management of these complications.”

About the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) represents more than 7,000 endocrinologists in the United States and abroad. AACE is the largest association of clinical endocrinologists in the world. The majority of AACE members are certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and concentrate on the treatment of patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders including diabetes, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, growth hormone deficiency, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity. Visit our site at www.aace.com.

About the American College of Endocrinology (ACE)

The American College of Endocrinology (ACE) is the educational and scientific arm of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). ACE is the leader in advancing the care and prevention of endocrine and metabolic disorders by: providing professional education and reliable public health information; recognizing excellence in education, research and service; promoting clinical research and defining the future of Clinical Endocrinology. For more information, please visit www.aace.com/college.

Contacts

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
Mary Green, 407-506-2960
mgreen@aace.com

Release Summary

Certified Diabetes Educator-Ambassadors (CDE-A), professionals who work in the primary care setting, can help patients with diabetes while easing the endocrinologist shortage.

Contacts

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
Mary Green, 407-506-2960
mgreen@aace.com