Research and Markets: Intellectual Property Workers: The Impact on Network Operators 2015

DUBLIN--()--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4mx6cr/intellectual) has announced the addition of the "Intellectual Property Workers: The Impact on Network Operators" report to their offering.

This SPIE re-examines the dynamics of 21st Century work, then looks at employment data coming out of the United States economy in order to gauge if an increasing focus on IP production is actually beginning to sort the workforce for technical acuity. This SPIE will be of interest to operators and public policy makers.

Under the influence of technology, work has followed an inevitable path towards greater abstraction. That is, as work increasingly becomes dependent on machines initially, water powered mills; and, ultimately, computer-powered IT shops has evolved away from the actual production of things to the design of things. To the extent that physical production is required, work has been automated, as well, or outsourced to areas with cheaper labor. Consequently, the value that businesses generate has increasingly been associated with IP.

IP is an interesting commodity: it is ephemeral, existing simply as a concept, but it has extreme value. IP expressed as a consumer good, say an iPhone, can be worth billions of dollars. Yet, if never expressed as a product, its value can be very low and, in fact, can be rendered non-existent, if some other good idea captures a market niche first. Consequently, IP's value is maximized by a quick expression in the marketplace, as a product; and can be minimized by premature exposure say, to one's competitors.

IP development is an exercise in creativity, and requires a combination of skill sets. Good innovators not only know technology, but also have a feel for the ways in which technology can evolve. Impractical ideas have no value, but practical ones can have great value. It is a challenging balancing act to know which is which; and, sometimes, the successful innovator pushes the envelope on what is considered doable. As an example, a story involving HP, possibly apocryphal, has it that William Hewlett one day told his engineers to build him a personal scientific calculator that he could put in his pocket. Until then, no one had considered that such a thing was possible or even desirable. The story is that Hewlett didn't necessarily want to market such a device; he simply wanted something to replace his slide rule. As a result, a new market was born; and millions of calculators later, just about everyone has one.

Key Topics Covered:

1. Introduction

2. Work in the 21st Century

3. United States Employment Growth

4. Implications for Operators

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4mx6cr/intellectual

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Sector: Patents

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Sector: Patents