Zenger Folkman Unveils New Research on Increasing Accountability in Organizations

-Strengths-based leadership development experts have discovered the eight key behaviors that increase accountability-

SALT LAKE CITY--()--Imagine you are in a company meeting and your boss says, "How is that project coming along?" Do you admit the project is behind and that you are struggling, or do you smile and reply, "Everything's fine"? Strengths-based leadership development firm Zenger Folkman has discovered a data driven method to increasing accountability, the company announced today, and has presented its new research on the eight behaviors that are statistically linked to increased personal accountability. The new information can be helpful to governments, organizations, schools and homes.

“One of the greatest issues in accountability stems from the amount of control people possess in their work,” said Joe Folkman, president of Zenger Folkman. "When employees are in control of the ‘what, when and how’ of a decision, their accountability is high. On the other hand, when others are in control of the way work gets done, accountability significantly decreases, our research has shown.”

While allotting more control is one of the primary issues that can improve accountability, the next step is understanding what behaviors can help others know that a person is accountable, Folkman said. To find this out, Zenger Folkman looked at 360-degree assessments from 40,000 leaders and examined leaders in the 90th percentile of effectiveness for accountability. An examination of these exceptional leaders’ behaviors shows eight specific traits that correlate to high accountability, as follows:

  1. Drive for Results. These individuals determine what is needed and what control they have to deliver those results.
  2. Honesty and Integrity. Those who are accountable have the courage to tell the truth.
  3. Trust. People feel accountable to leaders they trust.
  4. Clear Vision and Direction. Accountability comes when individuals have clarity and understanding of exactly what is expected of them.
  5. Problem Solving and Technical Expertise. If people don’t understand how to do the job, they are not able to be accountable to do it.
  6. Communication. Accountability rises when a leader’s ability to communicate effectively increases.
  7. Ability to Change. People who are good at creating change in an organization have employees who are operating at higher levels of accountability.
  8. Collaboration and Resolving Conflict. Cooperation breeds accountability, the research has shown.

Folkman continued, “On the long personal and organizational ‘to do’ list, accountability should be at the top. In fact, the single greatest way for leaders to leverage accountability is to pick a few of these key behaviors to work on themselves."

To learn more about how to develop these behaviors, attend Zenger Folkman’s free webinar The 8 Critical Behaviors That Leverage Accountability, on Nov. 19, by registering at http://zengerfolkman.com/event/webinar-8-critical-behaviors-that-leverage-accountability/. For more information on these findings, and how to incorporate them into a leadership development plan, visit www.zengerfolkman.com.

About Zenger Folkman:

Zenger Folkman is the authority in strengths-based leadership development. Their award-winning programs employ research-based methods that improve organizations and turn good managers into extraordinary leaders.

Contacts

Snapp Conner PR
Cheryl Snapp Conner, 801-994-9625
cheryl@snappconner.com

Contacts

Snapp Conner PR
Cheryl Snapp Conner, 801-994-9625
cheryl@snappconner.com