American Shoppers Willing to Spend 31 Percent More Per Week On Responsibly Produced Food

Loyalty to Trusted Food Brands at Stake when Controversial News Emerges from Supply Chains

NEW YORK--()--On average, Americans are willing to spend 31 percent more per week on grocery food produced in ways that uphold the principles of corporate social responsibility (CSR), according to the Conscious Consumer™ Study issued today by Gibbs-rbb Strategic Communications.

“Conscious Consumers are voting with their wallets, creating challenges for food and beverage marketers across their entire supply chain,” said Jeffrey R. Graubard, managing director of Gibbs-rbb Strategic Communications. “Consumers increasingly choose brands aligned with their values while penalizing brands that disappoint them. It’s Darwinian – survival of the fittest – and those companies that flourish are able to communicate resonant values consistently and transparently.”

The Conscious Consumer Study was conducted online in August 2014 among 2,010 U.S. adults by Harris Poll on behalf of Gibbs-rbb. Key findings include:

  • On average, Americans are willing to spend 31 percent extra per week on safe and sustainably produced grocery food for their household. U.S. households spend an average of $119.30 per week on grocery food, and consumers are willing to pay an additional $37.30 per week, or 31 percent more, on food that is produced in ways that advance the well-being of the planet, humans and safety of food sources.
  • Controversial news emerging from food supply chains can affect consumer loyalty. With price being equal, most Americans say they are likely to switch from a food brand they trusted if they learn that the company was involved in product recalls (77 percent), practices that harm animal welfare (73 percent) or irresponsible labor practices (72 percent).
  • Health, safety and waste reduction are significant considerations in decisions to buy food. With price being equal, most U.S. adults consider nutritional content (88 percent), food safety (87 percent) or food waste (78 percent) as important when making food purchases for their households.
  • Trusted personal contacts, journalists, retailers and food businesses are important sources of information about the CSR activities of food companies. Most Americans rate word-of-mouth discussions (71 percent), news media (68 percent), content supplied by food retailers (66 percent) and content provided directly by food companies (66 percent) as important in their efforts to learn how food companies advance the well-being of the planet, humans and safety of food sources.
  • More women than men consider the well-being of animals and laborers as essential factors in preserving their trust in food brands. With price being equal, female consumers are more apt than their male counterparts to say they would be likely to switch from a food brand they trusted if they learned that the company was involved in practices that harm animal welfare (79 percent vs. 67 percent) and irresponsible labor practices (78 percent vs. 65 percent).
  • More women than men say workplace conditions and green packaging are key considerations in their food shopping choices. With price being equal, female consumers are more likely than their male counterparts to consider labor practices (72 percent vs. 64 percent) and sustainable packaging (76 percent vs. 69 percent) to be important when making food purchases for their households.

Gibbs-rbb provides integrated communications solutions to food, beverage and consumer packaged goods (CPG) clients, based on a holistic understanding of supply chains and global issues impacting brand loyalty and purchases among consumers. The communications venture specializes in engaging Conscious Consumers, a growing market segment of discerning consumers making buying decisions based on factors such as health, sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR).

The Conscious Consumer Study was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Gibbs-rbb from August 27-29, 2014 among 2,010 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Jeffrey R. Graubard.

To obtain a summary of the Conscious Consumer Study, please visit the Gibbs-rbb website.

About Gibbs-rbb Strategic Communications LLC

Gibbs-rbb Strategic Communications provides strategic direction and communications services to facilitate relationships between clients and Conscious Consumers™. The New York-based company helps food, beverage and consumer packaged goods clients stay connected to customers and consumers through a suite of business communication disciplines. Gibbs-rbb is supported by the global assets of more than 175 employees of its joint venture partners, Gibbs & Soell, Inc. and rbb Public Relations, which are both members of PROI Worldwide. To learn more, please visit www.gibbs-rbb.com.

Contacts

Gibbs-rbb Strategic Communications
Mary C. Buhay, 212-697-2600
mbuhay@gibbs-rbb.com

Contacts

Gibbs-rbb Strategic Communications
Mary C. Buhay, 212-697-2600
mbuhay@gibbs-rbb.com