Research and Markets: Social Media Monitoring: Listen and Learn

DUBLIN--()--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/v7n24n/social_media) has announced the addition of the "Social Media Monitoring: Listen and Learn" report to their offering.

This report assesses the value of social media monitoring to the enterprise, and explores the products and perspectives of three prominent social media monitoring providers. It should be of interest to both buyers and sellers of these solutions as they navigate the emerging social sphere.

Along with this content, and unseen by the people who share it, goes a steady stream of data, noting who is posting, where else they have been online, and how they are connected to one another. From a business standpoint, the emerging social sphere presents a rich new source of market data, as well as a new medium for sales and service.

Accordingly, businesses are beginning to monitor social media, and experimenting with social marketing and customer service, primarily in the B2C markets, and to a somewhat lesser extent in B2B. Social media monitoring and participation are expected to improve customer engagement, build brand loyalty, and attract additional revenue. While such hopes seem intuitively reasonable, and anecdotal use cases are accumulating, reliably quantifiable returns on investment (ROI) have proven to be elusive thus far. Folding social media activity into traditional marketing strategies presents additional challenges, the most obvious of which have to do with the brand's inability to control its public image in the social sphere.

Businesses also are under a great deal of pressure to be socially accessible and responsive, at least in the B2C realm. As workers, people still follow the usual corporate procedures for problem-solving, but as consumers, they have stopped looking for help on corporate websites or suffering "unusually long wait times" on 800-numbers while being told periodically to "find answers on our website." Instead, they expect that a quick Facebook exchange with the company will resolve their complaint or get the answers they need. On the other hand, consumers don't want companies to get "creepy" with social advances that are deemed too personal, and they punish companies whom they perceive have failed to protect their privacy. Clearly, businesses will need to tread carefully as they use social data and participate in social media.

Key Topics Covered:

  1. Executive Summary
  2. Introduction
  3. What Businesses Can Learn from Social Media
  4. More Data on Customers and Competitors Adds Value
  5. Sysomos
  6. Brandwatch
  7. Sprinklr
  8. Market and Industry Dynamics
  9. The Last Word

Companies Mentioned

  • Brandwatch
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Sprinklr
  • Sysomos
  • Twitter

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/v7n24n/social_media

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Sector: Social Media

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Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470
For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716
Sector: Social Media