Comprehensive Study Reveals Valuable Data About Diabetes In U.S. Hispanic/Latino Populations

LAS VEGAS--()--A comprehensive, multi-year medical research study examining health issues among U.S. Hispanic/Latino groups has yielded data indicating that less than half of the participants diagnosed with diabetes had the condition under control.

The data was presented today at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists’ (AACE) 23rd Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress.

The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, spearheaded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), recruited and examined more than 16,000 participants in four cities from 2008 to 2011 to identify risk factors that play a role in the development of cardiovascular and other diseases in Hispanics/Latinos, the largest ethnic minority group in the U.S. The study is ongoing.

“As a group, approximately one-third of Hispanics with the disease do not know they have diabetes,” said Dr. Larissa Aviles-Santa, M.P.H., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.E., the study’s project director and Medical Officer with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Division of Cardiovascular Sciences. “So there is an opportunity here to take a look at clinical practices and think about how we can enhance guidelines and raise awareness amongst the Hispanic community.”

The study also revealed significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes across Hispanic groups: the disease was more common among those of Mexican, Puerto Rican and Dominican origin and least prevalent among those from South America.

“This shows that talking about Hispanics as a group can be misleading,” Aviles-Santa notes. “I would encourage educators and clinicians to consider Hispanics as not just one culture and one mentality, but a whole spectrum.”

To read additional press releases about the AACE 23rd Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress in Las Vegas, please visit media.aace.com or use the Twitter hashtag #AACE14.

For a brief bio and photo of Dr. Aviles-Santa, please click here.

About the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) represents more than 6,500 endocrinologists in the United States and abroad. AACE is the largest association of clinical endocrinologists in the world. The majority of AACE members are certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and concentrate on the treatment of patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders including diabetes, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, growth hormone deficiency, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity. Visit our site at www.aace.com.

About the American College of Endocrinology (ACE)

The American College of Endocrinology (ACE) is the educational and scientific arm of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). ACE is the leader in advancing the care and prevention of endocrine and metabolic disorders by providing professional education and reliable public health information; recognizing excellence in education, research and service; promoting clinical research and defining the future of clinical endocrinology. For more information, please visit www.aace.com/college.

Contacts

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
Mary Green, 407-506-2020
mgreen@aace.com

Release Summary

A study on US Hispanic groups presented at the AACE Annual Meeting shows less than half of the participants diagnosed with diabetes had the condition under control.

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Contacts

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
Mary Green, 407-506-2020
mgreen@aace.com