Contrary to the Latest Misleading Article, BPA Epoxy Resins Contribute to Health Cost Savings by Protecting Consumers from Food Borne Illness

WASHINGTON--()--The following statement, providing perspective on New York University’s study that analyzed the health care cost implications of bisphenol A (BPA) published in Health Affairs, can be attributed to Dr. John M. Rost, Chairman of the North American Metal Packaging Alliance, Inc. (NAMPA):

“This analysis focuses on the theoretical costs associated with concerns of potential health effects, while ignoring the scientific perspective of reputable regulatory bodies around the world who have repeatedly concluded that at the actual low levels of current exposure, BPA does not pose a health threat to people. In fact, the entire premise of this study is based on the misguided pre-determination that BPA is associated with obesity and cardiovascular effects.

“In the report, the author attempted to quantify the effects of childhood obesity and adult coronary heart disease and attribute these diseases to BPA exposure. Whereas in fact, as recently as last week, in its comprehensive draft review of BPA, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) announced a far different conclusion, instead finding that ‘[b]ased on the results from several studies there is no convincing evidence that BPA is obesogenic’ and that ‘[a] causal link between BPA exposure and cardiovascular effects in humans cannot be established.’ The EFSA review clearly underscores the flawed premise on which this study is based, suggesting in turn, that the entire exercise and results are equally flawed.

“Equally important is the fact that the researchers also conveniently ignored the known track record of unprecedented safety and health protection provided by BPA epoxy resin in canned foods and beverages. In fact, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) records, there has not been an incident of food borne illness from a failure in metal packaging in more than 30 years.

“When you consider that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates more than 47.8 million people in the United States suffer from food borne illness, with nearly 128,000 of them requiring hospitalizations and another 3,000 dying from such illnesses, these known cost savings in health care from BPA-lined cans are real and they are considerable.”

About NAMPA

The North American Metal Packaging Alliance, Inc., and its members support sound science and trust the scientific review process that has protected our food supply for decades. For further information, visit www.metal-pack.org.

Contacts

for NAMPA
Jeff Urbanchuk, 202-223-4933
jurbanchuk@stantoncomm.com

Release Summary

The following statement provides perspective on New York University’s study that analyzed the health care cost implications of bisphenol A (BPA) published in Health Affairs.

Sharing

Contacts

for NAMPA
Jeff Urbanchuk, 202-223-4933
jurbanchuk@stantoncomm.com