Fewer Needle Pricks for Thyroid Biopsies

Endocrinologists Find Success, Limit Costs and Reduce Number of Sample Extractions Using Rapid Onsite Evaluations (ROSE) Without Assistance of Cytotechnologists

PHOENIX--()--Endocrinologists who have streamlined the process of determining acceptability of thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) biopsy samples generally reduce the number of aspirations needed by evaluating the samples themselves, without the assistance of a cytopathology technician, according to research presented today at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists’ (AACE) 22nd Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress.

As important, results of sample adequacy were comparable to those conducted with a cytopathologist present using Rapid Onsite Evaluation (ROSE). ROSE involves removing a tissue sample using Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA), creating a slide of, and then viewing the sample under a microscope. It can determine if a sample is viable to send to a lab for cytopathological evaluation. Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) is a type of biopsy procedure that uses a thin syringe needle to extract tissue for evaluation and diagnosis.

“Independence from onsite cytology technicians will improve endocrinologists’ procedural skill while proving more convenient and cost effective for patients, overall, considering the potential for reducing the need for repeating the FNA,” states study co-author and principal investigator, Saleh Aldasouqi, MD, FACE, ECNU.

Dr. Aldasouqi added: “The inherent problem with thyroid biopsies is inadequate specimens (non-diagnostic), and the need for repeated biopsies. When biopsies are performed in the traditional way (without ROSE), neither the endocrinologist nor the patient can be assured about adequacy at the time of the procedure, both waiting for the final result few days later. In this case, the patient will not only be worried about whether or not he or she may have cancer, but will also worry about whether or not he will return for a repeated biopsy. With ROSE, the endocrinologist can perform initially 2 or 3 passes and pause for specimen evaluation utilizing ROSE. He or she can then either perform extra 1-2 passes if inadequate or conclude the procedure if adequate cells are obtained, or if the endocrinologist determines that the nature of the thyroid nodule precludes adequate biopsy. The patient will know these findings at the time of the procedure.”

Study co-author Sameer Ansar, MD, notes that the need to have a cytology technician available has limited the utility of ROSE in the majority of office practices. “This procedure should become universal in every clinical endocrinologist’s office,” Dr. Ansar concludes, “We can help reduce the anxiety of our patients during a stressful situation.

To read additional press releases about the AACE 22st Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress in Phoenix, please visit media.aace.com or follow the Twitter hashtag #AACE2013.

For a brief bio and photo of Dr. Aldasouqi, please click here.

About the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) represents more than 6,500 endocrinologists in the United States and abroad. AACE is the largest association of clinical endocrinologists in the world. The majority of AACE members are certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and concentrate on the treatment of patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders including diabetes, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, growth hormone deficiency, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity. Visit our site at www.aace.com.

Contacts

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
Glenn Sebold, 904-353-7878
gsebold@aace.com

Sharing

Contacts

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
Glenn Sebold, 904-353-7878
gsebold@aace.com