Carey Lohrenz, First Female Navy Fighter Pilot, Available for Expert Commentary on Women in Combat through DStreet

MEMPHIS, Tenn.--()--United States Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin E. Dempsey announced today that the ban on women in the military will be lifted, and many are speculating on its meaning and impact.

DStreet, a boutique communications firm, is making Carey Lohrenz, the first female F-14 Tomcat Fighter Pilot in the U.S. Navy, available for comment to the media. Lohrenz understands the historical significance and impact of today's reversal of the 1994 rule restricting women from serving in infantry units. Lohrenz has a long history of speaking on leadership and the issue of women in the armed forces. She has previously appeared on CNN, MSNBC, NBC, CBS, ABC and NPR.

According to Lohrenz, women are already on the ground doing the tough work. “This is fantastic news. Restricting women from combat service and combat service specialties is foolish. We are not leveraging the best of the best when we eliminate female leaders from the talent pool. What makes any policy change successful is strong leadership, particularly when a cultural norm is perceived to be changing. It is now up to the senior leadership to make sure any difficulties implementing this policy change are minimized, and that the message that women in combat are here to stay is heard loud and clear.

The U.S. Military depends upon female service members to satisfy our military obligations. To continue the ban on women serving in combat blatantly ignores the leadership skills and talents that women bring to the table,” said Lohrenz. "Serving in combat positions is crucial to career advancement, and this removes the ‘brass ceiling.’ Hopefully soon we will see more women occupying key leadership position that influence and control the future of the military.”

Lohrenz continued, “Women have already proven themselves on the battlefield. The same old banter about the negative effect on unit cohesion or mission effectiveness, lack of physical strength, or the inability to deal with the ‘stress’ of combat just doesn’t hold true. Nor does the insulting argument that men will rush to protect women in their units. This argument should be offensive to men; they are not helpless slaves to their emotions. To insinuate that men would behave in such an unprofessional manner is a slap in the face to the professionals who wear the uniform today.”

For interviews, images, contributed commentary or additional information contact Jennifer Dulles or visit: http://www.careylohrenz.com.

Contacts

DStreet
Jennifer Dulles, APR
303-956-0001
jdulles@dstreetpr.com

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Contacts

DStreet
Jennifer Dulles, APR
303-956-0001
jdulles@dstreetpr.com