Democrats, Progressives Escalate Concern Over Criticism on Private Sector Higher Education

Student Success Stories Ignored

WASHINGTON--()--In advance of a new round of expected criticisms of career colleges by Iowa Democratic Senator Tom Harkin at a planned Thursday hearing, more prominent Democrats and progressive advocates are asking for fairness for students of private sector colleges and universities.

In a letter sent today to Harkin, Coalition for Educational Success spokesperson and former Clinton Administration Special Counsel Lanny J. Davis said that the Senator’s overly broad criticisms of career colleges along with proposed U.S. Department of Education rules, would likely have a disproportionate negative effect on disadvantaged students’ access to higher education, especially the lower income and minority students who predominantly attend these colleges.

Davis, a long-time supporter of Senator Harkin's, asked the Senator to try for more balance and fairness in the planned presentations at Thursday's hearings. “I hope that you will not, in fairness, ignore the millions of private sector college student and graduate success stories and not allow one witness with unproven allegations to testify without permitting another witness at the same table at the same time to provide a contemporaneous factual rebuttal. I respectfully suggest that to do otherwise would be unfair--and inconsistent with all I have observed in your public service over the years,” said Davis in the letter to Senator Harkin.

Davis joins more than 80 members of Congress, including dozens of prominent Democrats, who have voiced their concern over proposed Education Department rules heavily promoted by Harkin, which would limit college access and choice for minority and poor students. Just this week, progressive Democratic Senators Roland Burris, Herb Kohl and Bill Nelson asked for reconsideration of the proposal. Leading groups in the African-American and Latino community have also added to the growing chorus of opposition.

More than 2 million students will enroll in career colleges this year, seeking a direct path into the job market by expanding their skills and knowledge. The overwhelming majority are non-traditional students - full time workers, working parents, minorities, workforce returners and veterans.

Forty-three percent of students at career colleges are minorities and sixty-five percent are women. The schools graduate nearly double the proportion of minority students when compared to other institutions.

“In the worst economy in a generation, we need more minority and underprivileged kids in college, yet some in Congress and the Obama Administration are considering new regulations that will create obstacles instead of opportunities,” said Davis. “Underserved students, more than any others, depend on private-sector colleges. Proposals being discussed will have dramatic consequences by denying choice and access to students, impeding skills training to fill open jobs in the workforce and choking innovation in higher education.”

The Coalition for Educational Success includes many of the nation’s leading proprietary colleges, serving more than 200,000 students at over 300 campuses in 33 states. Member schools deliver on what they promise – preparing students for work and then, through intensive career assistance and support, place almost three-quarters of their graduates immediately into jobs. For more information, visit www.ed-success.org.

Photos/Multimedia Gallery Available: http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/mmg.cgi?eid=6448126&lang=en

Contacts

Coalition for Educational Success
Noah Black
202.295.8797
Noah.Black@harbourgrp.com

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Contacts

Coalition for Educational Success
Noah Black
202.295.8797
Noah.Black@harbourgrp.com