Survey Identifies Diet Fatigue as a Leading Cause of Diet Failure

25% of Dieters Have Attempted at Least 20 Diets and 60% Regained Lost Weight

NEW YORK--()--Dieters, some of whom have tried as many as 20 different diets, reported tiring of dieting as a primary reason for stopping a weight loss program, according to a survey conducted by About.com Health and InsightExpress.

More than 30 percent of respondents cited having dieted between three to five times in their lifetime, and a quarter have attempted dieting at least 20 times. When asked to identify the types of diets they have tried, 42 percent said WeightWatchers followed by the Atkins Diet (37 percent), The South Beach Diet (36 percent) and Slim-Fast (31 percent). The majority of respondents (54 percent) have tried between two to five diets and 24 percent have always used the same diet.

Despite their attempts at weight loss, 60 percent of respondents regained weight after their diets ended, almost half seeing at least 75 percent of total weight lost return and 20 percent adding more weight than they lost. The average dieter shed between five and nine pounds on their most recent diet. A quarter dropping between 50 to 99 pounds on all diets combined with an equal number of respondents losing between 10 to 29 pounds.

Were seeing that consumers are leaning on commercial and fad diets that follow a rigid program and dont necessarily establish eating habits that the dieter can maintain over the long-term, said Kate Grossman, M.D., medical director, About.com Health.

When asked to identify factors that contributed to quitting a diet, the majority (40 percent) said they generally tired of dieting; 22 percent cited that their diet did not allow them to eat enough of the foods that they enjoy; and 21 percent said their diet was too restrictive to stick to for a long period of time.

When asked to describe their attitudes toward food, approximately 68 percent of respondents said they continue to eat after they are full. Sixty-two percent said they are likely to use food to comfort themselves when they are in a bad or sad mood and 55 percent eat food regardless of whether or not they are hungry. Forty-three percent said that it would be easier to stick to diets if friends and family members did not influence their eating habits.

The About.com Health/InsightExpress diet survey was conducted from September 5-10, 2007 and was completed by approximately 500 respondents, 82 percent of whom were female.

About.com Health is one of the top health sites on the Web and a destination for consumers who are seeking resources to manage all aspects of their health. About.com Health maintains Calorie Count Plus (http://caloriecount.about.com) a free site that provides guidance and support to dieters through interactive tools combined with community elements and information on food and exercise.

About About.com

Founded in 1996, About.com is one of the Webs leading producers of original content. The sites expert Guides provide users with accurate and unbiased information to help them live happier, healthier and more successful lives.

In March 2005, About.com was acquired by The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT), a leading media company with 2006 revenues of $3.3 billion, which includes The New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, 15 other daily newspapers, WQXR-FM and more than 30 Web sites, including NYTimes.com, Boston.com and About.com. The Company's core purpose is to enhance society by creating, collecting and distributing high-quality news, information and entertainment.

This press release can be downloaded from www.nytco.com

Contacts

About.com
Lisa Langsdorf, 212-204-1467
llangsdorf@about.com

Contacts

About.com
Lisa Langsdorf, 212-204-1467
llangsdorf@about.com