Research and Markets: Consumer Research in the U.S. reported lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) consumers are spending 25% more on leisure travel than heterosexual travellers

DUBLIN, Ireland--()--June 15, 2006--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c38276) has announced the addition of Gay/Lesbian Travel in the United States to their offering.

Defining the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) consumers could result in a windfall for the mainstream travel industry, which has been experiencing a period of slowed growth. This consumer research confirms that the LGBT travellers are travelling often and spending more on travel. In 2003, LGBT travellers reported. Ninety-six percent of respondents had taken at least one short leisure trip in the previous year (compared to just 56% of mainstream travellers) and 98% of respondents indicated that a destination's gay-friendly reputation influenced their decision to visit.

This report clearly identifies the principal external factors driving or curtailing growth in the market for LGBT travel. Consumer research reveals the attitudes, needs and behavior of LGBT consumers, with analysis broken down both by demographic characteristics, and by travel type (for example, LGBT travellers prefer travel in the non-peak months of October, September and February, creating opportunity for a reliable off-season business).

Six years of specific sales data provide a factual and impartial presentation of the market as a whole. The report also evaluates the performance of individual sectors in the market and provides information about the major companies and brands. Using the SPSS forecasting package, a five-year forecast of U.S. retail sales in the market is created, revealing potential opportunities for growth and product development.

Definition of the Gay Traveller

The LGBT travel market can be divided into the following categories:

Single Male - 74%

Single Female - 21%

Gay Families - 6%

Consumers use several self-identification labels, which include gay, lesbian, bisexual, homosexual, queer, transgendered, and many others. The GL Census qualifies gay, lesbian, homosexual and queer respondents, while the Harris Interactive survey qualifies gay, lesbian and bisexual respondents. This is not to discount other labels. Indeed, the gay travel industry can benefit greatly from awareness of and gay friendliness toward all labels. As such, the author offers an in depth explanation of what labels mean in the gay community and defines more labels than are analyzed by either survey.

Data Sources

To help travel merchants capitalize on the resilience and wealth of the gay travel market, the author has analyzed consumer data from three sources, all of which have mutually supporting findings.

First, the author analyzed data from GL Census Partners, a partnership between OpusComm group and Syracuse University in New York. The Census is the world's largest panel research into the consumer habits of the gay/lesbian market to be conducted by a university. The 2005 Gay/Lesbian Consumer Online Census is based on the sample of 7,215 adults aged 18 and over.

The author also analyzed an online survey by Harris Interactive. The survey sample included 2,630 U.S. adults, of whom 177 were self-identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual. The online survey was conducted between March 8 and 14, 2005

Finally, the author presented a profile of the gay lesbian consumer from CMI's (Community Marketing Inc.) 2005 annual Gay and Lesbian Community Survey, which was based on the responses of 24,000 gay and lesbian consumers who belong to gay mailing lists, subscribe to gay publications and visit gay websites. CMI profile supports the findings of other data sources.

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c38276

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood
Fax: +353 1 4100 980
press@researchandmarkets.com

Contacts

Research and Markets
Laura Wood
Fax: +353 1 4100 980
press@researchandmarkets.com